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Cloud archiving Get Started

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Evaluate Cloud archiving Vendors & Products

Weigh the pros and cons of technologies, products and projects you are considering.

  • Assess your need for cloud backup vendors' archiving services

    When deciding whether to use cloud archiving, you need to determine if your organization really needs it, and if what the vendor offers is actually an archive service. Continue Reading

  • Five data migration approaches for cloud archiving

    Administrators can take several approaches to migrating data to a cloud archive, from manual migration to using cloud-integrated storage. Continue Reading

  • Take a closer look at public cloud providers

    Using public cloud can save an organization money, but with the growing field of public cloud providers, deciding which one best suits your needs may be difficult. In this handbook, we evaluate the different available cloud service providers, big and small.

    Once an organization makes the decision to implement a public cloud, they then have to decide which cloud service provider works best with their environment. Public cloud providers offer unique service-level agreements, security practices hardware and software compatibility, and pricing models, so it is up to the organization to decide which provider is the best fit for its environment.

    Amazon Web Services is the current king of public cloud providers, but other smaller, newer services might offer significant benefits. Meanwhile, some large cloud providers now deliver services that tier performance, cost and scalability as a way to specialize their off-site storage for active archiving, backup or primary data. That's why it's more important than ever to consider the overall function of the cloud storage to narrow down the long list of public cloud providers. Determining at the outset whether the cloud service will be used for backup, archiving or active data helps the storage administrator weigh the importance of additional considerations such as cost and performance. This handbook discusses the many available options, what you can expect from each of them, and provides a checklist of the most important considerations based on use case.

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Manage Cloud archiving

Learn to apply best practices and optimize your operations.

  • Enterprise data protection strategy needs archive, backup

    Whether you use disk, tape or cloud in your enterprise data protection, where you send your archives and backups is up to you. Continue Reading

  • The state of the software-defined storage market

    The software-defined storage market is getting a lot of attention these days, piquing the interest of budget-challenged storage managers. But the lure of software running on the cheap may be misleading if you're not ready for some DIY or to sacrifice some of the features you come to expect in storage systems. We profile the various iterations of software-defined storage, and offer detailed pros and cons of each.

    Some say that archiving is one of the key killer apps that will make cloud storage a popular option. There are some compelling advantages to shipping unused data off site, but you need to know about the sometimes subtle differences among these services.

    In our 10th Quality Awards for NAS systems, we had one surprise winner -- Synology -- and a NAS pioneer returning to the winner's circle after a short absence -- NetApp. Read about how your peers rank NAS products for their service, support and reliability.

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  • Office 365 archiving subject to inconsistencies

    Companies that are subject to compliance or other regulatory requirements should take note: Archiving Office 365 applications takes several forms. Continue Reading

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Problem Solve Cloud archiving Issues

We’ve gathered up expert advice and tips from professionals like you so that the answers you need are always available.

  • How an effective data archiving system can ease backup woes

    Backup and archiving are two different animals. A backup is designed to restore data to a specific point in time following an outage. Archives, on the other hand, are designed to store data that is not currently in use but cannot be deleted for extended periods of time. In addition, an archive must be searchable, so specific information can be retrieved within a reasonable amount of time. For example, all of the emails from a specific employee, within a specific timeframe in the event of a legal discovery request. But, archiving can play a very important role in the data protection process, by moving infrequently accessed data out of the backup process. Doing so speeds backups and reduces costs. Backup software vendors today are adding archiving functionality to products or integrating their backup and archive products and many expect that this convergence will continue. Chapter two of our e-book on backup software looks at how archiving can ease backup's burden. Continue Reading

  • Which archive type is best for small businesses?

    Which archive type is best for small offices: tape, disk or the cloud? There are many factors you must consider before answering this question. Continue Reading

  • What's best for archiving?

    What's the best choice: tape-based, disk-based or cloud-based archiving? Continue Reading

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