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  • Dell EMC acquisition: The deal of the century a year later

    A year has passed since the Dell EMC acquisition, the biggest transaction in the history of IT. With the benefit of hindsight, we examine the positives, negatives and uncertainties of the deal. Did Dell buy the world's biggest storage vendor, or did EMC round out its infrastructure strategy? Was the timing of the Dell EMC acquisition good, and were the reasons behind it sound? Does it matter? What are the long-term prospects? How about the complications of integrating companies with different corporate cultures and overlapping product lines? What's the effect on the data storage market in general?

    Public cloud use has increased at a remarkable rate. So much so, it's a matter of when, not if, public cloud adoption will match on-site infrastructure. Vendor lock-in is a top concern IT decision-makers and practitioners have with cloud services. An emerging set of multicloud primary storage products mitigate this problem by providing data services simultaneously across multiple public clouds. Explore the key drivers and benefits of these multicloud storage products and services. Find out what customers want from them. And learn about the vendors that meet these diverse customer requirements and how they deliver on the promise of multicloud storage.

    The open source software movement has potential to change the face of storage. With the commoditization of servers and storage media, costs are low and reliability is high enough to use off-the-shelf components to build storage platforms with software-defined storage products, including open source. This trend is reducing or eliminating dependence on proprietary storage hardware and software. Find out which open source technologies support object-, file- and block-based storage individually or in combination.

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  • The state of flash storage performance

    All-flash arrays have virtually eliminated flash storage performance issues, for now. But applications and user expectations will eventually catch up. Innovations in flash technology -- such as nonvolatile memory express and storage-class memory (flash DIMM) -- promise to keep solid-state storage ahead of the curve, however. We discuss these technologies and more as we explore the current and future states of flash storage performance.

    DevOps allows developers to rapidly create, develop, amend and deploy applications using Agile methodologies. DevOps resources, including storage, are consumed differently, though, taking more of a cloud-like approach.

    Security and compliance concerns are big obstacles to public cloud storage adoption. Reliability, data movement and poor application performance, frequently from irregular spikes in network latency, are other important caveats. We provide tips on how to overcome these and other issues.

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  • Best bets for modernizing legacy storage systems

    Traditionally, storage arrays were purchased on three- to five-year contracts, but modern budgets often require companies to keep their arrays for seven years. With the pace at which data storage technology changes today, 7-year-old legacy storage systems can be considered ancient. But you can use the latest data storage technology to keep up to date. For instance, most legacy storage systems today support new media types as they come out. That means you can drastically expand a system's capacity and even performance by using higher-density drives or by replacing hard disk drives with solid-state drives.

    Software-defined storage can also be used to extend the life of arrays, especially SDS that supports commodity hardware. SDS can run on top of older arrays to deliver more efficient and newer data management capabilities.

    Older large arrays can also be complemented by flash caching devices or software that improves performance. And instead of buying a new SAN or NAS system, a company can add a smaller-capacity hyper-converged appliance or all-flash array for a specific application -- such as virtual desktops. The cloud can also be used to push off new array purchases and keep utilization down on legacy storage systems. Companies can move applications such as archiving that do not require great performance off to a public cloud.

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