Browse Definitions :
Definition

forking (software fork)

Forking is to take the source code from an open source software program and develop an entirely new program.

Forking is often the result of a deadlock in an open source project that is so insurmountable that all work stops. Typically this happens when development team members are unable to resolve personal conflicts or fail to reach a consensus about next steps. Forks may also occur when core members of an open source development team decide not to address use cases that other members of the development community feel are important.

Software forks can be controversial when they duplicate efforts, but most developers agree that the right to fork is open source software's greatest strength. A successful fork can save development time, inspire other uses for old code and create new business opportunities. To be considered a fork, the newer version of the software must have its own name and its own developer community. When a new program remains compatible with the original program, it is referred to as a shallow fork.

The name fork is derived from the POSIX standard for operating systsems. In this context, a fork is a process that generates a copy of itself. 

This was last updated in June 2014

Continue Reading About forking (software fork)

Networking
  • Network as a Service (NaaS)

    Network as a service, or NaaS, is a business model for delivering enterprise WAN services virtually on a subscription basis.

  • network configuration management (NCM)

    Network configuration management is the process of organizing and maintaining information about all of the components in a ...

  • presentation layer

    The presentation layer resides at Layer 6 of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model and ensures that ...

Security
  • backdoor (computing)

    A backdoor attack is a means to access a computer system or encrypted data that bypasses the system's customary security ...

  • Heartbleed

    Heartbleed was a vulnerability in some implementations of OpenSSL, an open source cryptographic library.

  • What is risk management and why is it important?

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

CIO
HRSoftware
  • team collaboration

    Team collaboration is a communication and project management approach that emphasizes teamwork, innovative thinking and equal ...

  • employee self-service (ESS)

    Employee self-service (ESS) is a widely used human resources technology that enables employees to perform many job-related ...

  • learning experience platform (LXP)

    A learning experience platform (LXP) is an AI-driven peer learning experience platform delivered using software as a service (...

Customer Experience
  • headless commerce (headless e-commerce)

    Headless commerce, also called headless e-commerce, is a platform architecture that decouples the front end of an e-commerce ...

  • chief customer officer (CCO)

    A chief customer officer, or customer experience officer, is responsible for customer research, communicating with company ...

  • relationship marketing

    Relationship marketing is a facet of customer relationship management (CRM) that focuses on customer loyalty and long-term ...

Close