Information Security Definitions

This glossary explains the meaning of key words and phrases that information technology (IT) and business professionals use when discussing IT security and related software products. You can find additional definitions by visiting WhatIs.com or using the search box below.

Search Definitions
  • W

    Web application firewall (WAF)

    A web application firewall (WAF) is a firewall that monitors, filters and blocks data packets as they travel to and from a website or web application.

  • web server security

    Web server security is the protection of information assets that can be accessed from a Web server.

  • WebAuthn API

    The Web Authentication API (WebAuthn API) is a credential management application program interface (API) that lets web applications authenticate users without storing their passwords on servers.

  • whaling attack (whaling phishing)

    A whaling attack, also known as whaling phishing or a whaling phishing attack, is a specific type of phishing attack that targets high-profile employees, such as the CEO or CFO, in order to steal sensitive information from a company.

  • white hat hacker

    A white hat hacker -- or ethical hacker -- is an individual who uses hacking skills to identify security vulnerabilities in hardware, software or networks.

  • Wi-Fi Pineapple

    A Wi-Fi Pineapple is a wireless auditing platform from Hak5 that allows network security administrators to conduct penetration tests.

  • Wi-Fi Sense

    Windows Wi-Fi Sense allows Windows 10 users to get Internet access from public hotspots and private wireless local area networks (WLANs) that have been shared by friends. Although Wi-Fi Sense is enabled by default in all editions of Windows 10, the feature can be turned off by users and access can be disabled by wireless network administrators.

  • wildcard certificate

    A wildcard certificate is a digital certificate that is applied to a domain and all its subdomains.

  • Windows Defender Exploit Guard

    Windows Defender Exploit Guard (EG) is an anti-malware software developed by Microsoft that provides intrusion protection for users with the Windows 10 operating system (OS).

  • Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP)

    Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is a security protocol, specified in the IEEE Wireless Fidelity (Wi-Fi) standard, 802.11b.

  • WLAN Authentication and Privacy Infrastructure (WAPI)

    WLAN Authentication and Privacy Infrastructure (WAPI) is a wireless local area network security standard officially supported by the Chinese government.

  • WPA3

    WPA3 is a security certification program developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance to ensure Wi-Fi related products meet a common standard.

  • X

    X.509 certificate

    An X.509 certificate is a digital certificate that uses the widely accepted international X.509 public key infrastructure (PKI) standard to verify that a public key belongs to the user, computer or service identity contained within the certificate.

  • Y

    YubiKey

    YubiKey is an authentication device that allows users to securely log into their email, online services, computers and applications using one-time passwords, static passwords or FIDO-based public and private key pairs.

  • Z

    What is zero trust? Ultimate guide to the network security model

    Zero trust is a security strategy that assumes all users, devices and transactions are already compromised. The zero trust model requires strict identity and device verification, regardless of the user’s location in relation to the network perimeter.

  • zero-day (computer)

    Zero-day is a flaw in software, hardware or firmware that is unknown to the party or parties responsible for patching or otherwise fixing the flaw.

  • Zeus Trojan (Zbot)

    Zeus, also known as Zbot, is a malware toolkit that allows a cybercriminal to build his own Trojan Horse. A Trojan Horse is programming that appears to be legitimate but actually hides an attack.

  • Zoombombing

    Zoombombing is a type of cyber-harassment in which an individual or a group of unwanted and uninvited users interrupt online meetings over the Zoom video conference app.

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