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mobile workstation

A mobile workstation is a notebook computer with high-end computing features not typical of the notebook.

High-end features include faster graphics processors, more powerful CPUs and additional memory. Because of the extra features, mobile workstations often weigh a bit more than standard laptops. However, for professionals who require such features for their work, mobile workstations can enable portability that wasn't possible in the past. A mobile workstation should enable portable 3D design, scientific computing and multimedia creation, among other possibilities.

Mobile workstations have gone through a few generations, over which they have improved performance and reduced weight. See, below, a few examples:

Dell Precision M3800

  • 15.6 inches.
  • Just over four pounds.
  • Windows 8.1 Pro.
  • Intel Quad-Core i7 processor.
  • 16GB DDR3 RAM.
  • Nvidia Quadro K1100M graphics with 2 GB of video RAM.

Hewlett-Packard's ZBook 14

  • 14 inches.
  • 3.57 pounds.
  • 1 terabyte (TB) of storage.
  • Windows 8 Pro.
  • Either the fourth-generation Intel Core i5 or i7.
  • 16GB DDR3 RAM.

Toshiba Tecra W50

  • 15.6 inches.
  • 6 pounds.
  • Windows 8 Pro.
  • Intel Quad-Core i7 processor.
  • 16GB DDR3 RAM.
  • Nvidia Quadro K2100M graphics with 2 GB of video RAM.

 

This was last updated in October 2013

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