Browse Definitions :
Definition

endpoint authentication (device authentication)

Endpoint authentication is a security mechanism designed to ensure that only authorized devices can connect to a given network, site or service.

The approach is also known as device authentication. In this context, the endpoint most often considered is a mobile computing device, like a laptopsmart phone or tablet but it could be any connected hardware device on a TCP/IP network. The possibilities include desktop computers, printers, servers and specialized hardware such as POS terminals, Smart meters and other smart devices.

Endpoint security management is becoming increasingly important in the expanding areas of machine-to-machine (M2M) communications and the Internet of Things (IoT). Endpoint fingerprinting is one method of enabling authentication of non-traditional network endpoints such as smartcard readers, HVAC systems, medical equipment and IP-enabled door locks.

In human communications, endpoint authentication is often used in conjunction with user authentication for greater security. Authenticating both the user and the device can provide two-factor authentication (2FA). For a smartphone, there are apps that provide one time password tokens, allowing the phone itself to serve as the physical device to satisfy the possession factor. The password response sent from the registered device verifies that the user is connecting from an authorized endpoint.

 

 

 

 

This was last updated in December 2015

Continue Reading About endpoint authentication (device authentication)

Networking
  • Network as a Service (NaaS)

    Network as a service, or NaaS, is a business model for delivering enterprise WAN services virtually on a subscription basis.

  • network configuration management (NCM)

    Network configuration management is the process of organizing and maintaining information about all of the components in a ...

  • presentation layer

    The presentation layer resides at Layer 6 of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communications model and ensures that ...

Security
  • backdoor (computing)

    A backdoor attack is a means to access a computer system or encrypted data that bypasses the system's customary security ...

  • Heartbleed

    Heartbleed was a vulnerability in some implementations of OpenSSL, an open source cryptographic library.

  • What is risk management and why is it important?

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

CIO
HRSoftware
  • team collaboration

    Team collaboration is a communication and project management approach that emphasizes teamwork, innovative thinking and equal ...

  • employee self-service (ESS)

    Employee self-service (ESS) is a widely used human resources technology that enables employees to perform many job-related ...

  • learning experience platform (LXP)

    A learning experience platform (LXP) is an AI-driven peer learning experience platform delivered using software as a service (...

Customer Experience
  • headless commerce (headless e-commerce)

    Headless commerce, also called headless e-commerce, is a platform architecture that decouples the front end of an e-commerce ...

  • chief customer officer (CCO)

    A chief customer officer, or customer experience officer, is responsible for customer research, communicating with company ...

  • relationship marketing

    Relationship marketing is a facet of customer relationship management (CRM) that focuses on customer loyalty and long-term ...

Close