Browse Definitions :

Browse Definitions by Alphabet

SUN - WHA

  • sunk cost effect - The sunk cost effect is the tendency for humans to continue investing in something that clearly isn’t working.
  • sunsetting - Sunsetting is the intentional phasing out or termination of something, and in business, the term is used often regarding brands, partnerships, agreements, policies, and hardware and software.
  • supercomputer - A supercomputer is a computer that performs at or near the highest operational rate for computers.
  • superconducting quantum interference device - A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is a mechanism used to measure extremely weak signals, such as subtle changes in the human body's electromagnetic energy field.
  • superconductivity - Superconductivity is the ability of certain materials to conduct electric current with practically zero resistance.
  • supercookie - A supercookie is a type of tracking cookie inserted into an HTTP header by an internet service provider to collect data about a user's internet browsing history and habits.
  • Superdome - Superdome is a high-end 64-bit, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) PA-8600 processor-based UNIX server designed for e-commerce customers using very large databases.
  • Supermicro - Supermicro is a company that specializes in x86-64 server technology.
  • superposition - Superposition is the ability of a quantum system to be in multiple states at the same time until it is measured.
  • supervised learning - Supervised learning is an approach to creating artificial intelligence (AI), where a computer algorithm is trained on input data that has been labeled for a particular output.
  • supervisor call (SVC) - In computers, especially IBM mainframes, a supervisor call (SVC) is a processor instruction that directs the processor to pass control of the computer to the operating system's supervisor program.
  • supplier relationship management (SRM) - Supplier relationship management (SRM) is the systematic approach to evaluating vendors that supply goods, materials and services to an organization, determining each supplier's contribution to success and developing strategies to improve their performance.
  • supplier risk management - Supplier risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings that are caused by the organization's supply chain.
  • supply chain - A supply chain is the network of all the individuals, organizations, resources, activities and technology involved in the creation and sale of a product.
  • supply chain analytics - Supply chain analytics refers to the processes organizations use to gain insight and extract value from the large amounts of data associated with the procurement, processing and distribution of goods.
  • supply chain attack - A supply chain attack is a type of cyber attack that targets organizations by focusing on weaker links in an organization's supply chain.
  • supply chain execution (SCE) - Supply chain execution (SCE) is the flow of tasks involved in the supply chain, such as order fulfilment, procurement, warehousing and transporting.
  • supply chain finance - Supply chain finance is a set of technology-enabled business and financial processes that provides flexible payment options for a buyer and one of their suppliers at lower financing costs.
  • supply chain management (SCM) - Supply chain management (SCM) is the optimization of a product's creation and flow from raw material sourcing to production, logistics and delivery to the final customer.
  • Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) - Supply Chain Operations Reference (SCOR) is the process reference model used across industries as a supply chain management diagnostic tool.
  • Supply Chain Planning (SCP) - Supply chain planning (SCP) is the process of anticipating the demand for products and planning their materials and components, production, marketing, distribution and sale.
  • supply chain risk management (SCRM) - Supply chain risks include cost volatility, material shortages, supplier financial issues and disasters.
  • supply chain security - Supply chain security is the part of supply chain management that focuses on the risk management of external suppliers, vendors, logistics and transportation.
  • supply chain sustainability (SCS) - Supply chain sustainability (SCS) is a holistic view of supply chain processes, logistics and technologies that affect the environmental, social, economic and legal aspects of a supply chain's components.
  • supply chain transformation - Supply chain transformation is the addition and integration of technology to improve supply chain performance.
  • supply chain visibility (SCV) - Supply chain visibility (SCV) is the ability of parts, components or products in transit to be tracked from manufacturer to final destination.
  • supply-side platform (SSP) - A supply-side platform (SSP) is a software system that allows publishers to offer their available inventory to ad exchanges and demand-side platforms (DSP)s.
  • support vector machine (SVM) - A support vector machine (SVM) is a type of deep learning algorithm that performs supervised learning for classification or regression of data groups.
  • Surface (Microsoft Surface tablet) - Surface is a line of tablet computers from Microsoft.
  • surge suppressor (surge protector) - A surge suppressor (sometimes optimistically called a "surge protector") is a device inserted in the alternating current (AC) utility line and/or telephone line to prevent damage to electronic equipment from voltage "spikes" called transients.
  • surprise and delight - Surprise and delight is a marketing approach that seeks to attract and nurture customers by enhancing interactions with them and offering them unexpected rewards.
  • surveillance capitalism - Surveillance capitalism is the monetization of data captured through monitoring people's movements and behaviors online and in the physical world.
  • susceptance - Susceptance (symbolized B) is an expression of the ease with which alternating current (AC) passes through a capacitance or inductance.
  • SUSE - SUSE (pronounced soo-sah) is a multinational company that offers enterprise-grade open source products based on Linux technologies.
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) - SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) is a Linux-based server operating system created and maintained by the German-based organization, SUSE.
  • SUSE Manager - SUSE Manager is an open source infrastructure management tool for Linux systems.
  • sustainability risk management (SRM) - Sustainability risk management (SRM) is a business strategy that aligns profit goals with a company's environmental policies.
  • Swagger - Swagger is an open source set of rules, specifications and tools for developing and describing RESTful APIs.
  • swap file (swap space or page file) - A swap file is a system file that creates temporary storage space on a solid-state drive or hard disk when the system runs low on memory.
  • SWIFT FIN message - SWIFT FIN is a message type (MT) that transmits financial information from one financial institution to another.
  • Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) - Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS) is a public, packet-switched service aimed at enterprises that need to exchange large amounts of data with other enterprises over the wide area network on a nonconstant or bursty basis.
  • swivel chair interface - A swivel chair interface is a system for user input and interaction that requires them to move from one interface to another, sometimes duplicating work.
  • SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis) - SWOT analysis is a framework for identifying and analyzing an organization's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.
  • SYN flood attack - A SYN flood attack is a type of denial-of-service (DoS) attack on a computer server.
  • SYN scanning - SYN scanning is a tactic that a malicious hacker can use to determine the state of a communications port without establishing a full connection.
  • synchronicity - Synchronicity is a concept developed by psychologist Carl Jung to describe a perceived meaningful coincidence.
  • Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) - Synchronous Data Link Control (SDLC) is a transmission protocol used to synchronously transfer code-transparent, serial-by-bit data over a communications channel.
  • Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) - Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) is a group of fiber optic transmission rates that transport digital signals with different capacities.
  • synchronous mirroring - Synchronous mirroring is a type of data protection in which data is written to both a remote and local disk simultaneously.
  • Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) - Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) is a standard for synchronous data transmission on optical fibers.
  • synchronous replication - Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so there are multiple, current copies of the data.
  • synchronous/asynchronous API - Synchronous/asynchronous APIs are application programming interfaces that return data for requests either immediately or at a later time, respectively.
  • synectics - Synectics is a method of problem-solving that focuses on cultivating creative thinking, often among small groups of individuals with diverse experience and skills.
  • syntax - Syntax is the grammar, structure, or order of the elements in a language statement.
  • synthetic data - Synthetic data is information that's artificially manufactured rather than generated by real-world events.
  • synthetic monitoring - Synthetic monitoring is the use of software to simulate user interactions with a system.
  • syslog - Syslog is an IETF RFC 5424 standard protocol for computer logging and collection that is popular in Unix-like systems including servers, networking equipment and IoT devices.
  • sysplex and Parallel Sysplex - A sysplex is IBM's systems complex (the word sysplex comes from the first part of the word system and the last part of the word complex), introduced in 1990 as a platform for the MVS/ESA operating system for IBM mainframe servers.
  • Sysprep (System Preparation Tool) - Sysprep is Microsoft's System Preparation tool intended to duplicate, test and deliver new installations for the Windows operating system based on an established installation.
  • system - A system is a collection of elements or components that are organized for a common purpose.
  • system administrator (sysadmin) - A system administrator (sysadmin) is an information technolog professional who supports a multiuser computing environment and ensures continuous, optimal performance of IT services and support systems.
  • System Insights - System Insights is a feature that debuted in Windows Server 2019 that processes data and uses predictive analytics to warn administrators of potential issues with Windows Server deployments.
  • system of record (SOR) - A system of record (SOR) is an information storage and retrieval system that stores valuable data on an organizational system or process.
  • system of systems (SoS) - A system of systems (SoS) is the collection of multiple, independent systems in context as part of a larger, more complex system.
  • system operator (sysop) - A sysop is the person who runs a computer server.
  • System Restore - System Restore is a utility to protect and revert the Windows client operating system to a previous state -- known as a restore point -- undoing system changes made since that time to avoid a reinstall of the operating system.
  • system software - System software is a type of computer program that is designed to run a computer's hardware and application programs.
  • system testing - System testing, also referred to as system-level tests or system-integration testing, is the process in which a quality assurance (QA) team evaluates how the various components of an application interact together in the full, integrated system or application.
  • system tray - The system tray (or "systray") is a section of the taskbars in the Microsoft Windows operating system user interface that provides easy access icons to the user's most commonly used apps and displays the clock.
  • system-on-a-chip (SoC) - System-on-a-chip (SoC) technology is the packaging of all the necessary electronic circuits and parts for a "system" (such as a cell phone or digital camera) on a single integrated circuit (IC), generally known as a microchip.
  • systems development life cycle (SDLC) - The systems development life cycle (SDLC) is a conceptual model used in project management that describes the stages involved in an information system development project, from an initial feasibility study through maintenance of the completed application.
  • systems engineering (SE) - Systems engineering (SE) is an interdisciplinary area of technology that encompasses software and hardware systems design and development with consideration to their interconnections and the environment in which they operate.
  • systems integrator - A systems integrator is an individual or business that builds computing systems for clients by combining hardware, software, networking and storage products from multiple vendors.
  • systems of engagement - Systems of engagement are decentralized IT components that incorporate technologies such as social media and the cloud to encourage and enable peer interaction.
  • systems thinking - Systems thinking is a holistic approach to analysis that focuses on the way that a system's constituent parts interrelate and how systems work over time and within the context of larger systems.
  • What is a SAN? Ultimate storage area network guide - A storage area network (SAN) is a dedicated high-speed network or subnetwork that interconnects and presents shared pools of storage devices to multiple servers.
  • What is a Server? - A server is a computer program or device that provides a service to another computer program and its user, also known as the client.
  • What is SecOps? Everything you need to know - SecOps, formed from a combination of security and IT operations staff, is a highly skilled team focused on monitoring and assessing risk and protecting corporate assets, often operating from a security operations center, or SOC.
  • What is server sprawl and how to prevent it? - Server sprawl is when multiple underutilized servers take up more space and consume more resources than can be justified by their workload.
  • What is server virtualization? The ultimate guide - Server virtualization is a process that creates and abstracts multiple virtual instances on a single server.
  • What is steganography? - Steganography (pronounced STEHG-uh-NAH-gruhf-ee, from Greek steganos, or "covered," and graphie, or "writing") is the hiding of a secret message within an ordinary message and the extraction of it at its destination.
SearchNetworking
  • throughput

    Throughput is a measure of how many units of information a system can process in a given amount of time.

  • traffic shaping

    Traffic shaping, also known as packet shaping, is a congestion management method that regulates network data transfer by delaying...

  • open networking

    Open networking describes a network that uses open standards and commodity hardware.

SearchSecurity
  • buffer underflow

    A buffer underflow, also known as a buffer underrun or a buffer underwrite, is when the buffer -- the temporary holding space ...

  • single sign-on (SSO)

    Single sign-on (SSO) is a session and user authentication service that permits a user to use one set of login credentials -- for ...

  • pen testing (penetration testing)

    A penetration test, also called a pen test or ethical hacking, is a cybersecurity technique that organizations use to identify, ...

SearchCIO
  • benchmark

    A benchmark is a standard or point of reference people can use to measure something else.

  • spatial computing

    Spatial computing broadly characterizes the processes and tools used to capture, process and interact with 3D data.

  • organizational goals

    Organizational goals are strategic objectives that a company's management establishes to outline expected outcomes and guide ...

SearchHRSoftware
  • talent acquisition

    Talent acquisition is the strategic process employers use to analyze their long-term talent needs in the context of business ...

  • employee retention

    Employee retention is the organizational goal of keeping productive and talented workers and reducing turnover by fostering a ...

  • hybrid work model

    A hybrid work model is a workforce structure that includes employees who work remotely and those who work on site, in a company's...

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