Browse Definitions :

Network administration

Terms related to managing computer networks, including definitions about LANS or WANS and words and phrases about network design, troubleshooting, security and backups.

100 - DEE

  • 100 Gigabit Ethernet (100 GbE) - 100 Gigabit Ethernet (100 GbE) is an Ethernet standard that supports data speeds of up to 100 billion bits (gigabits) per second (Gbps).
  • 10BASE-T - 10BASE-T is an Ethernet standard for local area networks and one of several physical media specified in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.
  • 40 Gigabit Ethernet (40GbE) - 40 Gigabit Ethernet (40GbE) is a standard that enables the transfer of Ethernet frames at speeds of up to 40 gigabits per second (Gbps).
  • AAA server (authentication, authorization and accounting) - An AAA server is a server program that handles user requests for access to computer resources and, for an enterprise, provides authentication, authorization and accounting (AAA) services.
  • acceptable use policy (AUP) - An acceptable use policy (AUP) is a document stipulating constraints and practices that a user must agree to for access to a corporate network, the internet or other resources.
  • Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) - Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) is a scalable, high-speed, web-based cloud storage service.
  • AMD-V (AMD virtualization) - AMD-V (AMD virtualization) is a set of hardware extensions for the X86 processor architecture.
  • analog telephone adapter (ATA) - An analog telephone adaptor (ATA) is a device used to connect a standard telephone to a computer or network so that the user can make calls over the Internet.
  • Apache Kafka - Apache Kafka is a distributed publish-subscribe messaging system that receives data from disparate source systems and makes the data available to target systems in real time.
  • Apple Bonjour - Apple Bonjour is a group of networking technologies designed to help devices and applications discover each other on the same network.
  • application blacklisting - Application blacklisting, sometimes just referred to as blacklisting, is a network administration practice used to prevent the execution of undesirable programs.
  • application clustering (software clustering) - Application clustering (sometimes called software clustering) is a method of turning multiple computer servers into a cluster (a group of servers that acts like a single system).
  • application delivery controller (ADC) - An application delivery controller (ADC) is a network component that manages and optimizes how client machines connect to web and enterprise application servers.
  • application streaming - Application streaming is an on-demand software delivery model that takes advantage of the fact that most applications require only a small fraction of their total program code to run.
  • application whitelisting - Application whitelisting is the practice of specifying an index of approved software applications or executable files that are permitted to be present and active on a computer system.
  • attack surface - An attack surface is defined as the total number of all possible entry points for unauthorized access into any system.
  • authentication server - An authentication server is an application that facilitates the authentication of an entity that attempts to access a network.
  • authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) - Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) is a framework for intelligently controlling access to computer resources, enforcing policies, auditing usage, and providing the information necessary to bill for services.
  • auto attendant (automated attendant) - An automated attendant (AA) is a telephony system that transfers incoming calls to various extensions as specified by callers, without the intervention of a human operator.
  • automated speech recognition (ASR) - Automated speech recognition (ASR) is a technology that allows users of information systems to speak entries rather than punching numbers on a keypad.
  • Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) - Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) is a feature of Windows-based OSes -- included since Windows 98 and Windows ME -- that enables a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol client to automatically assign an IP address to itself when there's no DHCP server available to perform that function.
  • autonomous system (AS) - An autonomous system (AS) in networking is a collection of one or more associated Internet Protocol (IP) prefixes with a clearly defined routing policy that governs how the AS exchanges routing information with other autonomous systems.
  • AWS CloudWatch - Amazon CloudWatch is a component of Amazon Web Services that provides monitoring for AWS resources and the customer applications running on the Amazon infrastructure.
  • backhaul - Backhaul, a term probably derived from the trucking industry, has several usages in information technology.
  • backup domain controller (Windows NT) - A backup domain controller (BDC) is a role a Windows NT computer takes on to help manage access to network resources.
  • bandwidth (network bandwidth) - Network bandwidth is a measurement indicating the maximum capacity of a wired or wireless communications link to transmit data over a network connection in a given amount of time.
  • bare-metal provisioning - Bare-metal provisioning is the process of installing an operating system (OS) or Type 1 hypervisor directly on a computer's hardware.
  • baseboard management controller (BMC) - A baseboard management controller (BMC) is a specialized service processor that monitors the physical state of a computer, network server or other hardware device using sensors and communicating with the system administrator through an independent connection.
  • beamforming - Beamforming is a type of radio frequency (RF) management in which a wireless signal is directed toward a specific receiving device.
  • BIOS attack - A BIOS attack is an exploit that infects the BIOS with malicious code and is persistent through reboots and attempts to reflash the firmware.
  • BIOS rootkit - A BIOS-level rootkit is programming that exists in a system's memory hardware to enable remote administration.
  • blacklist - A blacklist, in IT, is a collection of entities that are blocked from communicating with or logging into a computer, site or network.
  • Blue Cloud - Blue Cloud is an approach to shared infrastructure developed by IBM.
  • blue pill rootkit - The blue pill rootkit is malware that executes as a hypervisor to gain control of computer resources.
  • BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) - BOOTP (Bootstrap Protocol) is an internet protocol that lets a network user automatically be configured to receive an IP address and have an operating system booted without user involvement.
  • BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) - BREW (Binary Runtime Environment for Wireless) is Qualcomm's open source application development platform for wireless devices equipped for code division multiple access (CDMA) technology.
  • Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) - The Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is an initiative within the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) created to promote the development and adoption of broadband throughout the United States, particularly in unserved and underserved areas.
  • built-in administrator account - In the Windows operating system, the built-in administrator account -- the first account created when the OS was installed -- has the highest permissions of any profile on the computer system.
  • bus network - A bus network is a local area network (LAN) topology in which each node -- a workstation or other device -- is connected to a main cable or link called a bus.
  • BYOT (bring your own technology) - Bring your own technology (BYOT) is a policy that allows employees or students to use their own personal electronic devices at work or scho.
  • cache - A cache -- pronounced CASH -- is hardware or software that is used to store something, usually data, temporarily in a computing environment.
  • canonical name (CNAME) - A canonical name (CNAME) is a type of Domain Name System (DNS) database record that indicates that a domain name is the nickname or alias for another domain name.
  • captive portal - A captive portal is a Web page that the user of a public-access network is obliged to view and interact with before access is granted.
  • certification - In information technology as in other fields such as teaching, accounting, and acupuncture, certification is a formal process of making certain that an individual is qualified in terms of particular knowledge or skills.
  • change request - A change request is a formal proposal for an alteration to some product or system.
  • Chaos Monkey - Chaos Monkey is a software tool that was developed by Netflix engineers to test the resiliency and recoverability of their Amazon Web Services (AWS).
  • chatty protocol - A chatty protocol is an application or routing protocol requiring a client or server to wait for an acknowledgment before transmitting data again.
  • checkpoint - A checkpoint, in a virtualization context, is a snapshot of the state of a virtual machine.
  • chief integration officer (CIO) - A chief integration officer (CIO) is a corporate executive in charge of ensuring the coordination of all interacting systems within the enterprise and its extended environments.
  • CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing or supernetting) - CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) -- also known as supernetting -- is a method of assigning Internet Protocol (IP) addresses that improves the efficiency of address distribution and replaces the previous system based on class A, class B and class C networks.
  • circular logging - Circular logging is a method of conserving hard disk space in the Microsoft Exchange transactional logging process.
  • Cisco Borderless Networks - Cisco Borderless Networks is the brand name for a set of hardware and software technologies which allow "anyone, anywhere, anytime, and on any device" to connect to an organization's network.
  • Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) - Cisco Enterprise Agreement (EA) is a software buying program that digitizes and simplifies license management for Cisco suite customers.
  • Cisco Identity Services Engine (ISE) - Cisco Identity Services Engine (ISE) is a security policy management platform that provides secure network access to users and devices.
  • Class of Service (CoS) - Class of Service (CoS) is a way of managing traffic in a network by grouping similar types of traffic -- such as email, streaming video, voice over IP and large document file transfer -- together and treating each type as a class with its own level of network service priority.
  • clean install - A clean install is a software installation in which any previous version is eradicated.
  • cloaking - Cloaking is the masking of the sender's name and address in an e-mail note or distribution.
  • Clonezilla - Clonezilla is a free open source disk cloning application based on Debian.
  • Clos network - A Clos network is a type of non-blocking, multistage switching architecture that reduces the number of ports required in an interconnected fabric.
  • cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR) - Cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR) is a combination of strategies and services intended to back up data, applications and other resources to public cloud or dedicated service providers.
  • cloud ecosystem - A cloud ecosystem is a complex system of interdependent components that all work together to enable cloud services.
  • cloud service latency - Latency greatly affects how usable and enjoyable devices and communications are.
  • cloud storage API - A cloud storage API is an application programming interface that connects a locally based application to a cloud-based storage system so that a user can send data to it and access and work with data stored in it.
  • cloud storage gateway - A cloud storage gateway is a hardware- or software-based appliance that serves as a bridge between local applications and remote cloud-based storage.
  • cloud-native network function (CNF) - A cloud-native network function (CNF) is a service that performs network duties in software, as opposed to purpose-built hardware.
  • cluster quorum disk - A cluster quorum disk is the storage medium on which the configuration database is stored for a cluster computing network.
  • CMDB (configuration management database) - A configuration management database (CMDB) is a file -- usually, in the form of a standardized database -- that contains all relevant information about the hardware and software components used in an organization's IT (information technology) services and the relationships between those components.
  • CNAME - A CNAME specifies an alias or nickname for a canonical name record in a domain name system (DNS) database.
  • codec - A codec is a hardware- or software-based process that compresses and decompresses large amounts of data.
  • collision - In a half duplex Ethernet network, a collision is the result of two devices on the same network attempting to transmit data at exactly the same time.
  • command prompt - A command prompt is the input field in a text-based user interface screen for an operating system (OS) or program.
  • communication portal - A communication portal is a service that allows individuals, businesses, schools and government agencies to share information from diverse sources using unified communications (UC) media.
  • computer network - A computer network, also referred to as a data network, is a series of interconnected nodes that can transmit, receive and exchange data, voice and video traffic.
  • conductance - Conductance is an expression of the ease with which electric current flows through materials like metals and nonmetals.
  • Conficker - Conficker is a fast-spreading worm that targets a vulnerability (MS08-067) in Windows operating systems.
  • connection broker - In desktop virtualization, a connection broker is a software program that allows the end-user to connect to an available desktop.
  • connectionless - In telecommunications, connectionless describes communication between two network endpoints in which a message can be sent from one endpoint to another without prior arrangement.
  • content-addressed memory (CAM) - Content-addressable memory (CAM) is computer memory that operates like a hardware search engine for search-intensive applications.
  • converged network adapter (CNA) - A converged network adapter (CNA) is a single network interface device that provides the functionality of both a Fibre Channel (FC) host bus adapter (HBA) and a TCP/IP Ethernet network interface card (NIC).
  • COPE (corporate-owned, personally enabled) - COPE (corporate-owned personally-enabled) is a business model in which an organization provides its employees with mobile computing devices and allows the employees to use them as if they were personally-owned notebook computers, tablets or smartphones.
  • correlation engine - A correlation engine is a software application that programmatically understands relationships.
  • CPE device - A CPE device is telecommunications hardware located at the home or business of a customer.
  • CRAM (challenge-response authentication mechanism) - CRAM (challenge-response authentication mechanism) is the two-level scheme for authenticating network users that is used as part of the Web's Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).
  • cross-bar switch - In a network, a cross-bar switch is a device that is capable of channeling data between any two devices that are attached to it up to its maximum number of ports.
  • CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) - CSMA/CA (Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Avoidance) is a protocol for carrier transmission in 802.
  • custom domain name suffix (custom TLD) - A custom domain name suffix, or custom TLD, is a top-level domain (TLD) name that belongs to a single organization.
  • CYOD (choose your own device) - CYOD (choose your own device) is an alternative model to BYOD (bring your own device) that involves allowing employees to select the device they want from among a limited number of options.
  • data availability - Data availability is a term used by computer storage manufacturers and storage service providers to describe how data should be available at a required level of performance in situations ranging from normal through disastrous.
  • data breach - A data breach is a cyber attack in which sensitive, confidential or otherwise protected data has been accessed or disclosed in an unauthorized fashion.
  • data center bridging (DCB) - DCB is a suite of IEEE standards designed to enable lossless transport over Ethernet and a converged network for all data center applications.
  • data center services - Data center services is a collective term for all the supporting components necessary to the proper operation of data center.
  • data link control (DLC) - DLC also is an abbreviation for digital loop carrier.
  • data link layer - The data link layer is the protocol layer in a program that handles the moving of data into and out of a physical link in a network.
  • data protection management (DPM) - Data protection management (DPM) comprises the administration, monitoring and management of backup processes to ensure backup tasks run on schedule and data is securely backed up and recoverable.
  • data reduction - Data reduction is the process of reducing the amount of capacity required to store data.
  • data streaming - Data streaming is the continuous transfer of data at a steady, high-speed rate.
  • database activity monitoring (DAM) - Database activity monitoring (DAM) systems monitor and record activity in a database and then generate alerts for anything unusual.
  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) - In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.
  • deep packet inspection (DPI) - Deep packet inspection (DPI) is an advanced method of examining and managing network traffic.
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