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Electronics

Terms related to electronics, including definitions about electrical components and words and phrases about computers, laptops parts, digital cameras, televisions and home appliances.
  • 42 (h2g2, meaning of life, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy) - In Douglas Adams' "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," 42 is the number from which all meaning ("the meaning of life, the universe, and everything") can be derived.
  • 720p - 720p is a high-definition (HD) display standard used to describe the resolution of a television or computer display that measures 1280 x 720 pixels.
  • A-weighted decibel (dBA or dB(A)) - A-weighted decibel (dBA or dB(A)) is an expression of the relative loudness of sounds as perceived by the human ear.
  • accumulator - An accumulator is a type of register for short-term, intermediate storage of arithmetic and logic data in a computer's central processing unit (CPU).
  • admittance (Y) - Admittance (symbolized Y) is an expression of the ease with which alternating current (AC) flows through a complex circuit or system.
  • AF (audio frequency or a.f.) - AF is a frequency such that, if applied to a transducer such as a loudspeaker or headset, will produce acoustic waves within the range of human hearing.
  • agri-tech - Agri-tech, sometimes ag-tech, agtech or digital agriculture, is the application of technology and digital tools to farming.
  • ambient temperature - Ambient temperature is the air temperature of any object or environment where equipment is stored.
  • American Wire Gauge (AWG) - American Wire Gauge (AWG) is the standard way to denote wire size in North America.
  • ampere - An ampere is a unit of measure of the rate of electron flow or current in an electrical conductor.
  • ampere hour (Ah or amp hour) - Ampere hour -- sometimes abbreviated as Ah or amp hour -- is the amount of energy charge in a battery that enables 1 ampere of current to flow for one hour.
  • ampere per meter (A/m) - The ampere per meter (A/m) is the measure for magnetic field strength, as defined by the International System of Units (SI).
  • amplification factor (gain) - The amplification factor, also called gain, is the extent to which an analog amplifier boosts the strength of a signal.
  • amplifier - An amplifier is an electronic device that increases the voltage, current, or power of a signal.
  • analog telephone adapter (ATA) - An analog telephone adapter (ATA) is a device used to connect an analog telephone, fax machine or similar equipment to a computer or network to enable communications over the internet.
  • analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) - Analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) is an electronic process in which a continuously variable, or analog, signal is changed into a multilevel digital signal without altering its essential content.
  • Android OS - Android OS is a Linux-based mobile operating system that primarily runs on smartphones and tablets.
  • anode - An anode is the electrode in a polarized electrical device through which current flows in from an outside circuit.
  • antenna - An antenna is a specialized transducer that converts electric current into electromagnetic (EM) waves or vice versa.
  • apparent power - Apparent power is a measure of alternating current (AC) power that is computed by multiplying the root-mean-square (rms) current by the root-mean-square voltage.
  • Apple - Apple Inc. (formerly Apple Computer Inc.
  • Apple 3D Touch - Apple 3D Touch was a hardware-based feature Apple introduced in iPhone 6s and 6s Plus devices running iOS 9 that perceives the amount of force a user puts on the touchscreen to activate different functions.
  • Arm processor - An Arm processor is one of a family of CPUs based on the RISC architecture for computer processors.
  • attenuation - Attenuation is a general term that refers to any reduction in the strength of a signal.
  • ATV (advanced television) - ATV (Advanced Television) is the name given by the U.
  • audio - Audio is sound that is within the acoustic range of human hearing.
  • barcode reader - A barcode reader, also called a price scanner or point-of-sale (POS) scanner, is a hand-held or stationary input device used to capture and read information contained in a barcode.
  • battery memory effect - The battery memory effect is a reduction in the longevity of a rechargeable battery's charge, due to incomplete discharge in previous uses.
  • bezel - A bezel is the border between the screen and frame of a computer monitor, smartphone or any other computing device.
  • Bohr radius - The Bohr radius is a physical constant that represents the most probable distance between the electron and nucleus of a hydrogen atom at its ground state (lowest energy level).
  • burn-in - Burn-in is a test in which a system or component is made to run for an extended period of time to detect problems.
  • calculator - A calculator is a device that performs arithmetic operations on numbers.
  • capacitor (capacitance) - In its simplest form, a capacitor consists of two conducting plates separated by an insulating material called thedielectric.
  • cathode - A cathode is the metallic electrode through which current flows out in a polarized electrical device.
  • cathode ray tube (CRT) - A cathode ray tube (CRT) is a specialized vacuumtube in which images are produced when an electron beam strikes aphosphorescent surface.
  • CD-ROM - A CD-ROM (Compact Disc Read-Only Memory) is a type of compact disc that can only be read, not written to.
  • charge (electric charge) - In physics, charge, also known as electric charge, electrical charge, or electrostatic charge and symbolized q, is a characteristic of a unit of matter that expresses the extent to which it has more or fewer electrons than protons.
  • charge-coupled device - A charge-coupled device (CCD) is a light-sensitive integrated circuit that captures images by converting photons to electrons.
  • cinema pulldown 3:2 (telecine) - Cinema pulldown 3:2 is an algorithm for matching the slower frame rate of film to the faster refresh rate of a 60 Hz television.
  • circuit - In electronics, a circuit is a complete circular path that electricity flows through.
  • clean electricity - Clean electricity, or carbon-free electricity, is electricity without high voltage spikes and drops, meaning it is low on emitting electrical pollution.
  • coexistence testing - Coexistence testing, similar to compatibility testing, is a method of measuring the ability of multiple devices to interact in a single environment with limited bandwidth.
  • complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) - A complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) is the semiconductor technology used in most of today's integrated circuits, also known as chips or microchips.
  • compound - In chemistry, a compound is a substance made up of two or more different chemical elements that are combined in a fixed ratio.
  • computer numerical control (CNC) - Computer numerical control (CNC) is a manufacturing method that automates the control, movement and precision of machine tools through the use of preprogrammed computer software, which is embedded inside the tools.
  • conductance - Conductance is an expression of the ease with which electric current flows through materials like metals and nonmetals.
  • conductor - A conductor, or electrical conductor, is a substance or material that allows electricity to flow through it.
  • conservation of angular momentum - Conservation of angular momentum is a physical property of a spinning system such that its spin remains constant unless it is acted upon by an external torque; put another way, the speed of rotation is constant as long as net torque is zero.
  • coulomb (C) - A coulomb (C) is the standard unit of electric charge in the International System of Units (SI).
  • cow power (biogas) - Cow power is a term for the conversion of manure to usable energy.
  • crosstalk - Crosstalk is a disturbance caused by the electric or magnetic fields of one telecommunication signal affecting a signal in an adjacent circuit.
  • current - Current is a flow of electrical charge carriers, usually electrons or electron-deficient atoms.
  • debouncing - Debouncing is removing unwanted input noise from buttons, switches or other user input.
  • decibels relative to isotropic (dBi) - Decibels relative to isotropic (dBi) is a unit of measurement that describes how much power an antenna transmits in a single direction when compared to an isotropic radiator, which transmits in all directions at once.
  • delivery drone - A delivery drone is a type of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) used for distributing packages to consumers through advanced AI technology.
  • dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) - Dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) is an optical fiber multiplexing technology that is used to increase the bandwidth of existing fiber networks.
  • dielectric constant - The dielectric constant of a substance or material is a measure of its ability to store electrical energy.
  • dielectric material - A dielectric material is a poor conductor of electricity but an efficient supporter of electrostatic fields.
  • digital signal processing (DSP) - Digital signal processing (DSP) refers to various techniques for improving the accuracy and reliability of digital communications.
  • digital television (DTV) - Digital television (DTV) is the transmission of television signals using a digital broadcast format rather than conventional analog methods.
  • digital video - Digital video is audio/visual content in a binary format, with information presented as a sequence of digital data rather than in a continuous signal as analog information is.
  • digital wallet - In general, a digital wallet is a software application, usually for a smartphone, that serves as an electronic version of a physical wallet.
  • diode - A diode is a specialized electronic component with two electrodes called the anode and the cathode.
  • DisplayPort - DisplayPort is an interface for digital displays, particularly computer monitors.
  • dot product (scalar product) - The dot product, also called scalar product, is a measure of how closely two vectors align with each other, in terms of the directions they point.
  • double-slit experiment - The double-slit experiment is a 19th century investigation into the properties of light that has since been found to demonstrate the wave-particle duality of photons, electrons and other particle types as well as demonstrate other quantum properties, such as superposition and interference.
  • dual Wi-Fi antenna - A dual Wi-Fi antenna is a pair of identical antennas on a wireless router or Wi-Fi-equipped device, intended to eliminate signal fading and dead spots.
  • e-bomb (electromagnetic bomb) - An e-bomb (electromagnetic bomb) is a weapon that uses an intense electromagnetic field to create a brief pulse of energy that affects electronic circuitry without harming humans or buildings.
  • e-waste - Electronic waste, also known as end-of-life (EOL) electronics or e-waste, refers to discarded, recycled or refurbished electrical and electronic products.
  • EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) - EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) is a user-modifiable ROM.
  • electric field strength - Electric field strength is a quantitative expression of the intensity of an electric field at a particular location.
  • electric grid - An electric grid is a network of synchronized power providers and consumers that are connected by transmission and distribution lines and operated by one or more control centers.
  • electric vehicle charging station - An electric vehicle charging station is equipment that connects an EV to a source of electricity to recharge electric cars, neighborhood electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids.
  • electromagnetic field - An electromagnetic field, sometimes referred to as an EM field, is generated when charged particles, such as electrons, are accelerated.
  • electromagnetic induction - Electromagnetic induction is the creation of an electro-motive force by way of a moving magnetic field around an electric conductor and, conversely, the creation of current by moving an electric conductor through a static magnetic field.
  • electromagnetic interference (EMI) - Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is unwanted noise or interference in an electrical path or circuit caused by an outside source.
  • electron - An electron is a negatively charged subatomic particle that can be either bound to an atom or free (not bound).
  • electrostatic discharge (ESD) - Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is the release of static electricity when two objects come into contact.
  • electrostatic field - When two objects in each other's vicinity have different electrical charges, an electrostatic field exists between them.
  • element - An element is a fundamental item that can't be easily broken into smaller pieces.
  • EM shielding (electromagnetic shielding) - EM shielding (electromagnetic shielding) is the practice of surrounding electronics and cables with conductive or magnetic materials to guard against incoming or outgoing emissions of electromagnetic frequencies (EMF).
  • embedded device - An embedded device is part of a larger computing system and has a specific purpose.
  • Energy Star - Energy Star is a government-backed labeling program that helps people and organizations save money and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by identifying factories, office equipment, home appliances and electronics that have superior energy efficiency.
  • EPROM (erasable programmable read-only memory) - EPROM (erasable programmable read-only memory) is memory that does not lose its data when the power supply is cut off.
  • fan-out - In digital circuitry, fan-out is a measure of the maximum number of digital inputs that the output of a single logic gate can feed without disrupting the circuitry's operations.
  • farad (F) - A farad (F) is the standard unit of capacitance in the International System of Units (SI).
  • Faraday constant - Faraday's constant, symbolized by the italic uppercase letter F, is the physical constant representing the electric charge in a mole.
  • field of view (FOV) - Field of view (FOV) is the open, observable area a person can see through their eyes or via an optical device, such as a camera.
  • field-effect transistor (FET) - A field-effect transistor (FET) is a type of transistor commonly used for weak-signal amplification (for example, for amplifying wireless signals).
  • field-replaceable unit (FRU) - In computer systems, a field-replaceable unit (FRU) is a circuit board or part that can be removed and replaced without having to send the entire product or system to a repair facility.
  • flash storage - Flash storage is any type of drive, repository or system that uses flash memory to write and store data for an extended period.
  • Flat-panel TV Guide - Benefits of flat-panel TVs | Flat-panel features to considerA quick comparison of LCD, LED, OLED and plasma TVsFlat-panel TV technologies: LCD | LED | Plasma | OLEDMore informationA flat-panel TV is a television set that uses one of several different technologies for display in a flat, thin format.
  • floating gate transistor (FGT) - A floating gate transistor (FGT) is a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology capable of holding an electrical charge in a memory device that is used to store data.
  • frequency - For an oscillating or varying current, frequency is the number of complete cycles per second in alternating current direction.
  • frequency band - In telecommunications, a frequency band -- sometimes called a band -- refers to a specific range of frequencies in the electromagnetic frequency spectrum assigned to certain applications.
  • frequency jammer - Frequency jamming is the disruption of radio signals through use of an over-powered signal in the same frequency range.
  • frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) - Frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) transmission is the repeated switching of the carrier frequency during radio transmission to reduce interference and avoid interception.
  • functional requirements - Functional requirements are the desired operations of a program, or system as defined in software development and systems engineering.
  • gallium arsenide (GaAs) - Gallium arsenide (chemical formula GaAs) is a semiconductor compound used in some diode s, field-effect transistors (FETs), and integrated circuits (ICs).
  • gallium arsenide field-effect transistor (GaAsFET) - A gallium arsenide field-effect transistor (GaAsFET) is a specialized type of field-effect transistor (FET) that is used in amplifier circuits at very-high, ultra-high, and microwave radio frequencies.
Networking
  • firewall as a service (FWaaS)

    Firewall as a service (FWaaS), also known as a cloud firewall, is a service that provides cloud-based network traffic analysis ...

  • private 5G

    Private 5G is a wireless network technology that delivers 5G cellular connectivity for private network use cases.

  • NFVi (network functions virtualization infrastructure)

    NFVi (network functions virtualization infrastructure) encompasses all of the networking hardware and software needed to support ...

Security
  • phishing

    Phishing is a fraudulent practice in which an attacker masquerades as a reputable entity or person in an email or other form of ...

  • computer forensics (cyber forensics)

    Computer forensics is the application of investigation and analysis techniques to gather and preserve evidence from a particular ...

  • cybersecurity

    Cybersecurity is the practice of protecting internet-connected systems such as hardware, software and data from cyberthreats.

CIO
HRSoftware
  • OKRs (Objectives and Key Results)

    OKRs (Objectives and Key Results) encourage companies to set, communicate and monitor organizational goals and results in an ...

  • cognitive diversity

    Cognitive diversity is the inclusion of people who have different styles of problem-solving and can offer unique perspectives ...

  • reference checking software

    Reference checking software is programming that automates the process of contacting and questioning the references of job ...

Customer Experience
  • martech (marketing technology)

    Martech (marketing technology) refers to the integration of software tools, platforms, and applications designed to streamline ...

  • transactional marketing

    Transactional marketing is a business strategy that focuses on single, point-of-sale transactions.

  • customer profiling

    Customer profiling is the detailed and systematic process of constructing a clear portrait of a company's ideal customer by ...

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