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IP core (intellectual property core)

An IP (intellectual property) core is a block of logic or data that is used in making a field programmable gate array ( FPGA ) or application-specific integrated circuit ( ASIC ) for a product. As essential elements of design reuse , IP cores are part of the growing electronic design automation ( EDA ) industry trend towards repeated use of previously designed components. Ideally, an IP core should be entirely portable - that is, able to easily be inserted into any vendor technology or design methodology. Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter ( UART s), central processing units ( CPU s), Ethernet controllers, and PCI interfaces are all examples of IP cores.

IP cores fall into one of three categories: hard cores , firm cores , or soft cores . Hard cores are physical manifestations of the IP design. These are best for plug-and-play applications, and are less portable and flexible than the other two types of cores. Like the hard cores, firm (sometimes called semi-hard ) cores also carry placement data but are configurable to various applications. The most flexible of the three, soft cores exist either as a netlist (a list of the logic gate s and associated interconnections making up an integrated circuit ) or hardware description language ( HDL ) code.

A number of organizations, such as the Free IP Project and Open Cores, have formed to promote open sharing of IP cores.

This was last updated in March 2011
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