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Internet technologies

This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet technologies, including definitions about port numbers, standards and protocols and words and phrases about how the Internet works.

136 - DOP

  • 136 browser colors with names - Some Web page creators prefer to specify colors by name rather than by hexadecimal red-green-blue (RGB) intensity value.
  • 24x7 (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) - 24x7 means "24 hours a day, 7 days a week" and is used to describe a service, such as computer server monitoring, that is continuous, is always available (day or night), or involves products that can run constantly without disruption or downtime.
  • 3PL (third-party logistics) - A 3PL (third-party logistics) provider offers outsourced logistics services, which encompass anything that involves management of one or more facets of procurement and fulfillment activities.
  • 4 P's marketing mix - The marketing mix, also known as the four P's of marketing, refers to the four key elements of a marketing strategy: product, price, place and promotion.
  • AAA server (authentication, authorization and accounting) - An AAA server is a server program that handles user requests for access to computer resources and, for an enterprise, provides authentication, authorization and accounting (AAA) services.
  • access log - An access log is a list of all requests for individual files -- such as Hypertext Markup Language files, their embedded graphic images and other associated files that get transmitted -- that people or bots have made from a website.
  • address space - Address space is the amount of memory allocated for all possible addresses for a computational entity -- for example, a device, a file, a server or a networked computer.
  • Adobe Flash Player - Adobe Flash Player is software used to stream and view video, audio, multimedia and Rich Internet Applications on a computer or supported mobile device.
  • AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) - AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) is a technique aimed at creating better and faster interactive web apps by combining several programming tools including JavaScript, dynamic HTML (DHTML) and Extensible Markup Language (XML).
  • algorithm - An algorithm is a procedure used for solving a problem or performing a computation.
  • Amazon Cloud Drive - Amazon Cloud Drive is an online storage service that allows users to upload and access music, videos, documents and photos from Web-connected devices.
  • Amazon Prime - Amazon Prime is a subscription membership to Amazon that offers customers premium services for a yearly or monthly fee.
  • analog telephone adapter (ATA) - An analog telephone adaptor (ATA) is a device used to connect a standard telephone to a computer or network so that the user can make calls over the Internet.
  • anti-replay protocol - The anti-replay protocol provides Internet Protocol (IP) packet-level security by making it impossible for a hacker to intercept message packets and insert changed packets into the data stream between a source computer and a destination computer.
  • Apache - Apache is a freely available Web server that is distributed under an "open source" license.
  • API management - API management is the process by which an organization creates, oversees and controls application program interfaces (APIs) in a secure and scalable environment.
  • Apple TV (Apple TV 4) - Apple TV is a set-top box that allows end users to stream multimedia content from the Internet over a television.
  • artificial intelligence of things (AIoT) - The artificial intelligence of things (AIoT) is the combination of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies and the internet of things (IoT) infrastructure.
  • atomic clock (NIST-F1) - An atomic clock is the most accurate type of timepiece in the world, designed to measure time according to vibrations within atom s.
  • authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) - Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) is a framework for intelligently controlling access to computer resources, enforcing policies, auditing usage, and providing the information necessary to bill for services.
  • autofill - Autofill is a feature in software programs and applications that automatically inserts previously-entered information for the user’s convenience.
  • Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) - Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) is a feature of Windows-based OSes -- included since Windows 98 and Windows ME -- that enables a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol client to automatically assign an IP address to itself when there's no DHCP server available to perform that function.
  • autonomous system (AS) - An autonomous system (AS) in networking is a collection of one or more associated Internet Protocol (IP) prefixes with a clearly defined routing policy that governs how the AS exchanges routing information with other autonomous systems.
  • backward compatible (backward compatibility) - Backward compatible (also known as downward compatible or backward compatibility) refers to a hardware or software system that can successfully use interfaces and data from earlier versions of the system or with other systems.
  • behavioral targeting - Behavioral targeting is the presentation of content and marketing based on the previous choices of users across websites.
  • bell curve - A bell curve is a form of graph that is used to visualize the distribution of a set of chosen values across a specified group that tend to have a central, normal values, as peak with low and high extremes tapering off relatively symmetrically on either side.
  • Betteridge's law (of headlines) - Betteridge's law (of headlines) is an adage that states "Any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word no.
  • BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) - BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) is the protocol underlying the global routing system of the internet.
  • Big Tech - Big Tech is a term that refers to the most dominant and largest technology companies in their respective sectors.
  • BIOS rootkit - A BIOS-level rootkit is programming that exists in a system's memory hardware to enable remote administration.
  • Bitcoin - Bitcoin is a digital currency -- also called cryptocurrency -- that can be traded for goods or services with vendors that accept Bitcoin as payment.
  • Bitcoin address - A Bitcoin address is a digital identifier that serves as a location where the cryptocurrency can be sent.
  • Bitly - Bitly is a URL shortener service that enables users to truncate webpage links.
  • blade server - A blade server, sometimes referred to as a high-density server, is a compact device containing a computer used to manage and distribute data in a collection of computers and systems, called a network.
  • blogroll - A blogroll is a list of blogs, usually placed in the sidebar of a blog, that reads as a list of recommendations by the blogger of other blogs.
  • blue screen of death (BSOD) - Officially called the stop screen, or stop error, the blue screen of death (BSOD) is a most unwanted error, second only to malware or ransomware in indicating that a user is in for a very bad day.
  • BPEL (Business Process Execution Language) - BPEL (Business Process Execution Language) is an XML-based language that allows web services, APIs and human processes in a service-oriented architecture (SOA) to interconnect and share data in a business workflow.
  • brain hacking - Brain hacking is the application of techniques and/or technologies to affect an individual’s mental state, cognitive processes or level of function.
  • browser - A browser is an application program that provides a way to look at and interact with all the information on the World Wide Web.
  • browser hijacker (browser hijacking) - A browser hijacker is a malware program that modifies web browser settings without the user's permission and redirects the user to websites the user had not intended to visit.
  • burn-in - Burn-in is a test in which a system or component is made to run for an extended period of time to detect problems.
  • Burning Man - Burning Man is an annual week-long experiment in temporary community.
  • cache - A cache -- pronounced CASH -- is hardware or software that is used to store something, usually data, temporarily in a computing environment.
  • call control - Call control is a process that is used in telecommunications networks to monitor and maintain connections once they have been established.
  • call deflection - Call deflection is a feature of voice over IP (VoIP) that automatically redirects a call from the called endpoint to another endpoint (usually a voice mailbox) when the called endpoint is busy.
  • call detail record (CDR) - A call detail record (CDR) in voice over IP (VoIP) is a file containing information about recent system usage such as the identities of sources (points of origin), the identities of destinations (endpoints), the duration of each call, the amount billed for each call, the total usage time in the billing period, the total free time remaining in the billing period, and the running total charged during the billing period.
  • call signaling - Call signaling is a process that is used to set up a connection in a telephone network.
  • canonical name (CNAME) - A canonical name (CNAME) is a type of Domain Name System (DNS) database record that indicates that a domain name is the nickname or alias for another domain name.
  • catfish - A catfish is someone who creates a false identity online to deceive victims, often as a means of attracting romantic interest.
  • certificate authority (CA) - A certificate authority (CA) is a trusted entity that issues Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) certificates.
  • channel partner - A channel partner is a person or organization that provides services or sells products on behalf of a software, hardware, networking or cloud services vendor.
  • chatting - While the term chatting or chitchat refers in general to communication between two or more parties that can occur in person, in today's modern age, it can also occur over the internet via Short Message Service (SMS) text message and Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS) or, for example, through tools like Slack and Microsoft Teams and social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter.
  • chiplet - A chiplet is a sub processing unit, usually controlled by a I/O controller chip on the same package.
  • Chromebook - Google Chromebook is a thin client laptop that is configured with the Chrome operating system (Chrome OS).
  • CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing or supernetting) - CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing or supernetting) is a method of assigning IP addresses that improves the efficiency of address distribution and replaces the previous system based on Class A, Class B and Class C networks.
  • CIFS (Common Internet File System) - CIFS (Common Internet File System) is a protocol that gained popularity around the year 2000, as vendors worked to establish an Internet Protocol-based file-sharing protocol.
  • clean install - A clean install is a software installation in which any previous version is eradicated.
  • clickstream data (clickstream analytics) - Clickstream data and clickstream analytics are the processes involved in collecting, analyzing and reporting aggregate data about which pages a website visitor visits -- and in what order.
  • clipboard - A clipboard is a temporary storage area for data that the user wants to copy from one place to another.
  • cloud access security broker (CASB) - A cloud access security broker (CASB) is a software tool or service that sits between an organization's on-premises infrastructure and a cloud provider's infrastructure.
  • cloud computing - Cloud computing is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the internet.
  • CNAME - A CNAME specifies an alias or nickname for a canonical name record in a domain name system (DNS) database.
  • colocation (colo) - A colocation facility, or colo, is a data center facility in which a business can rent space for servers and other computing hardware.
  • com - On the Internet, "com" is one of the top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • commodity hardware - Commodity hardware, in an IT context, is a device or device component that is relatively inexpensive, widely available and more or less interchangeable with other hardware of its type.
  • common gateway interface (CGI) - Also see FastCGI.
  • Common Language Runtime (CLR) - The Common Language Runtime (CLR) is programming that manages the execution of programs written in any of several supported languages, allowing them to share common object-oriented classes written in any of the languages.
  • computational linguistics (CL) - Computational linguistics (CL) is the application of computer science to the analysis and comprehension of written and spoken language.
  • connection - In telecommunication and computing in general, a connection is the successful completion of necessary arrangements so that two or more parties (for example, people or programs) can communicate at a long distance.
  • connectionless - In telecommunications, connectionless describes communication between two network endpoints in which a message can be sent from one endpoint to another without prior arrangement.
  • Consensus Algorithm - A consensus algorithm is a process in computer science used to achieve agreement on a single data value among distributed processes or systems.
  • consumerization of IT - The consumerization of IT refers to how software and hardware products designed for personal use migrated into the enterprise and were used for work purposes.
  • content filtering - Content filtering is a process involving the use of software or hardware to screen and/or restrict access to objectionable email, webpages, executables and other suspicious items.
  • content management system (CMS) - A content management system (CMS) is a software application or set of related programs that help create and manage digital content.
  • content personalization - Content personalization is a strategy that tailors webpages and other forms of content to individual users' characteristics or preferences.
  • cookie - A cookie is information that a website puts on a user's computer.
  • corportal (corporate portal) - Corportals, short for corporate portals, are sometimes referred to as enterprise information portals and are used by corporations to build their internal web presence by leveraging a company's information resources.
  • CSS (cascading style sheets) - This definition explains the meaning of cascading style sheets (CSS) and how using them with HTML pages is a user interface (UI) development best practice that complies with the separation of concerns design pattern.
  • Ctrl-Alt-Delete - On a personal computer with the Microsoft Windows operating system, Control+Alt+Delete is the combination of the Ctrl key, the Alt key, and Del key that a user can press at the same time to terminate an application task or to reboot the operating system.
  • custom domain name suffix (custom TLD) - A custom domain name suffix, or custom TLD, is a top-level domain (TLD) name that belongs to a single organization.
  • customer self-service (CSS) - Customer self-service is a type of electronic support (e-support) that allows end users to access information and perform routine tasks without requiring the assistance of a human.
  • customer service and support - Customer service is the support that organizations offer to customers before and after purchasing a product or service.
  • cyber - Cyber is a prefix used to describe a person, thing, or idea as part of the computer and information age.
  • cyberpsychology - Cyberpsychology is the field of study pertaining to the way people interact through computers or digital devices and the emotional effects that usage has on the brain.
  • dark web (darknet) - The dark web, also referred to as the darknet, is an encrypted portion of the internet that is not indexed by search engines and requires specific configuration or authorization to access.
  • data source name (DSN) - A data source name (DSN) is a data structure that contains the information about a specific database that an Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) driver needs in order to connect to it.
  • DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) - In network computing, DCE (Distributed Computing Environment) is an industry-standard software technology for setting up and managing computing and data exchange in a system of distributed computers.
  • death by PowerPoint - Death by PowerPoint is a phenomenon caused by the poor use of presentation software.
  • deep web - The deep web is an umbrella term for parts of the internet not fully accessible through standard search engines like Google, Bing and Yahoo.
  • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) - DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a network management protocol used to dynamically assign an Internet Protocol (IP) address to any device, or node, on a network so they can communicate using IP.
  • digital divide - The digital divide is a term that refers to the gap between demographics and regions that have access to modern information and communications technology, and those that don't or have restricted access.
  • digital drugs - Digital drugs, more accurately called binaural beats, are sounds that are thought to be capable of changing brain wave patterns and inducing an altered state of consciousness similar to that effected by taking drugs or achieving a deep state of meditation.
  • digital tattoo - With more than one meaning, a digital tattoo is to a temporary tattoo that is outfitted with electronics, such as sensors or a near field communication (NFC) chip.
  • digitization - Digitization is the process of converting information into a digital format.
  • disappearing e-mail - Disappearing e-mail is a message sent using a type of distribution management tool for e-mail.
  • distributed learning - Distributed learning is a general term used to describe a multi-media method of instructional delivery that includes a mix of Web-based instruction, streaming video conferencing, face-to-face classroom time, distance learning through television or video, or other combinations of electronic and traditional educational models.
  • DNS redirection - DNS redirection is the controversial practice of serving a Web page to a user that is different from either the one requested or one that might reasonably be expected, such as an error page.
  • domain - Specific to the internet, the term domain can refer to how the internet is structured, and domain also refers to how an organization's network resources are organized.
  • domain name system (DNS) - The domain name system (DNS) is a naming database in which internet domain names are located and translated into Internet Protocol (IP) addresses.
  • dopamine-driven feedback loop - A dopamine-driven feedback loop is a self-perpetuating circuit fueled by the way the neurotransmitter works with the brain’s reward system.
Networking
  • network traffic

    Network traffic is the amount of data that moves across a network during any given time.

  • dynamic and static

    In general, dynamic means 'energetic, capable of action and/or change, or forceful,' while static means 'stationary or fixed.'

  • MAC address (media access control address)

    A MAC address (media access control address) is a 12-digit hexadecimal number assigned to each device connected to the network.

Security
  • Evil Corp

    Evil Corp is an international cybercrime network that uses malicious software to steal money from victims' bank accounts and to ...

  • Trojan horse

    In computing, a Trojan horse is a program downloaded and installed on a computer that appears harmless, but is, in fact, ...

  • quantum key distribution (QKD)

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a secure communication method for exchanging encryption keys only known between shared parties.

CIO
  • benchmark

    A benchmark is a standard or point of reference people can use to measure something else.

  • spatial computing

    Spatial computing broadly characterizes the processes and tools used to capture, process and interact with 3D data.

  • organizational goals

    Organizational goals are strategic objectives that a company's management establishes to outline expected outcomes and guide ...

HRSoftware
  • talent acquisition

    Talent acquisition is the strategic process employers use to analyze their long-term talent needs in the context of business ...

  • employee retention

    Employee retention is the organizational goal of keeping productive and talented workers and reducing turnover by fostering a ...

  • hybrid work model

    A hybrid work model is a workforce structure that includes employees who work remotely and those who work on site, in a company's...

Customer Experience
  • BOPIS (buy online, pick up in-store)

    BOPIS (buy online, pick up in-store) is a business model that allows consumers to shop and place orders online and then pick up ...

  • real-time analytics

    Real-time analytics is the use of data and related resources for analysis as soon as it enters the system.

  • database marketing

    Database marketing is a systematic approach to the gathering, consolidation and processing of consumer data.

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