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Internet technologies

This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet technologies, including definitions about port numbers, standards and protocols and words and phrases about how the Internet works.
  • dynamic port numbers - Dynamic port numbers, also known as private port numbers, are the port numbers that are available for use by any application to use in communicating with any other application, using the internet's Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
  • e-business (electronic business) - E-business (electronic business) is the conduct of business processes on the internet.
  • e-commerce - E-commerce (electronic commerce) is the buying and selling of goods and services, or the transmitting of funds or data, over an electronic network, primarily the internet.
  • E911 (Enhanced 911) - In the United States, E911 (Enhanced 91 is support for wireless phone users who dial 911, the standard number for requesting help in an emergency.
  • email - Email (electronic mail) is the exchange of computer-stored messages from one user to one or more recipients via the internet.
  • email signature - An email signature -- or signature block or signature file -- is the short text that appears at the end of an email message to provide more information about the sender.
  • empirical analysis - Empirical analysis is an evidence-based approach to the study and interpretation of information.
  • Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) - An enterprise service bus (ESB) is a software platform used to distribute work among connected components of an application.
  • EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) - EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) is a ranking system that helps purchasers in the public and private sectors evaluate, compare and select desktop computers, notebooks and monitors based on their environmental attributes.
  • Exchange Online - Exchange Online is the hosted version of Microsoft's Exchange Server messaging platform that organizations can obtain as a stand-alone service or via an Office 365 subscription.
  • Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) - The Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) is a protocol for wireless networks that expands the authentication methods used by the Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), a protocol often used when connecting a computer to the internet.
  • extranet - An extranet is a private network that enterprises use to provide trusted third parties -- such as suppliers, vendors, partners, customers and other businesses -- secure, controlled access to business information or operations.
  • Facebook - Facebook is a social networking website that was founded in February 2004 by Harvard University students Chris Hughes, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, Eduardo Saverin and Mark Zuckerberg.
  • Facebook Connect - Facebook Connect is a single sign-on application which allows users to interact on other websites through their Facebook account.
  • Facebook Marketplace - Facebook Marketplace is classified-ad section of the social network that specializes in helping individuals and businesses sell items locally.
  • Facebook Mobile - Facebook Mobile is a feature that allows a user to access Facebook from their cell phone through text messages, e-mails, downloaded applications or a web browser.
  • Facebook page - A Facebook page is a public profile specifically created for businesses, brands, celebrities, causes, and other organizations.
  • Facebook status - A Facebook status is a social media update feature that enables users to discuss their thoughts, whereabouts or important information with their friends from their Facebook profile.
  • Facebook wall - A Facebook wall refers to the space on a Facebook user's profile where other users can post messages, pictures, videos and other digital content for their friends or the public to see.
  • FaceTime - FaceTime is a proprietary video and audio calling service developed by Apple Inc.
  • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) - The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is an independent agency of the United States (U.
  • FileZilla - FileZilla is a free, open source, file transfer protocol (FTP) software tool.
  • Firefox - Firefox is a free, open source web browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation and Mozilla Corporation in 2004.
  • first-order logic - First-order logic (FOL) refers to logic in which the predicate of a sentence or statement can only refer to a single subject.
  • for your information (FYI) - In both chat acronyms and in IT acronyms, FYI is the abbreviation for 'for your information.
  • FTP (File Transfer Protocol) - FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is a network protocol for transmitting files between computers over TCP/IP connections.
  • FUBAR - FUBAR is an acronym that originated in the military to stand for the words "f***ed up beyond all repair.
  • fully qualified domain name (FQDN) - A fully qualified domain name (FQDN) is the complete address of an internet host or computer.
  • fuzzy search - A fuzzy search is a technique that uses search algorithms to find strings that match patterns approximately.
  • gateway - A gateway is a network node used in telecommunications that connects two networks with different transmission protocols together.
  • general-purpose computer - A general-purpose computer is one that, given the application and required time, should be able to perform the most common computing tasks.
  • Gmail - Gmail (pronounced Gee-mail) is a free web-based email service that provides users with 15 GB of storage for messages and the ability to search for specific messages.
  • GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching or Multiprotocol Lambda Switching) - GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching) is a networking technology that enables fast and reliable network switching of data flows on any type of network infrastructure.
  • Google Analytics - Google Analytics is a web analytics service that provides numerous analytical tools for marketing purposes.
  • Google Chrome browser - Google Chrome browser is a free web browser used for accessing the internet and running web-based applications.
  • Google ChromeOS - Google ChromeOS, formerly Chrome OS, is a lightweight operating system (OS) built on ChromiumOS, an open source OS that shares the same code base as ChromeOS.
  • Google dork query - A Google dork query, sometimes just referred to as a dork, is a search string or custom query that uses advanced search operators to find information not readily available on a website.
  • Google Hangouts - Google Hangouts is a unified communications service that allows members to initiate and participate in text, voice or video chats, either one-on-one or in a group.
  • Google Sheets - Google Sheets is a web-based application that enables users to create, update and modify spreadsheets and share the data live online.
  • Google Street View - Google Street View is a feature of Google Maps that enables users to view and navigate through 360 degree horizontal and 290 degree vertical panoramic street level images of various cities around the world.
  • Google Trends - Google Trends is a free service provided by Google that displays how often specific keywords, subjects and phrases have been searched for on Google over a period of time.
  • Great Firewall of China - The Great Firewall of China is the name that western media has given to the combination of tools, services and rules that the government of the People's Republic of China uses to block certain internet content from those within China's borders.
  • grid computing - Grid computing is a system for connecting a large number of computer nodes into a distributed architecture that delivers the compute resources necessary to solve complex problems.
  • hairpinning - In general telecommunication, hairpinning is returning a message from an origin endpoint back in the direction it came from as a way to get it to its destination endpoint.
  • HELLO packet - A HELLO packet is a special data packet (message) that is sent out periodically from a router to establish and confirm network adjacency relationships to other routers in the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) communications protocol.
  • hop off - Hop off is a term used in telecommunications that refers to a point at which a signal or call leaves a network and moves to another network.
  • host (in computing) - A host is a computer or other device that communicates with other hosts on a network.
  • hosting (website hosting, web hosting and webhosting) - Web hosting -- also known as website hosting or webhosting -- is the process where a web hosting provider stores and maintains website files and applications on a server to make its customers' websites accessible on the internet.
  • HTML5 - HTML5 is commonly thought to be the fifth version, or release, of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), a standardized descriptive language that specifies how to structure webpages.
  • HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) - HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is the set of rules for transferring files -- such as text, images, sound, video and other multimedia files -- over the web.
  • Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon (HTTPD) - On the Web, each server has an HTTPD or Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon that waits in attendance for requests to come in from the rest of the Web.
  • Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) - Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is a protocol that secures communication and data transfer between a user's web browser and a website.
  • iBeacon - iBeacon is a small-scale network device that uses Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and acts as a transmitter to detect and track smartphones.
  • IBM Roadrunner - Roadrunner was a supercomputer developed by IBM at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico.
  • IDoc (intermediate document) - IDoc (intermediate document) is a standard data structure used in SAP applications to transfer data to and from SAP system applications and external systems.
  • image metadata - Image metadata is text information pertaining to an image file that is embedded into the file or saved to a separate file that is associated with the image file.
  • image recognition - Image recognition, in the context of machine vision, is the ability of software to identify objects, places, people, writing and actions in digital images.
  • inline frame (iframe) - An inline frame (iframe) is a HTML element that loads another HTML page within the document.
  • Instagram - Instagram is a free, online photo-sharing application and social network platform that was acquired by Facebook in 2012.
  • instant messaging - Instant messaging, often shortened to IM or IM'ing, is the exchange of near real-time messages through a standalone application or embedded software.
  • instruction set - An instruction set is a group of commands for a central processing unit (CPU) in machine language.
  • integration server - An integration server is a type of computer server that facilitates the interaction between different operating systems (OSes), services and applications across an enterprise IT environment.
  • interactive voice response (IVR) - Interactive voice response (IVR) is an automated telephony system that interacts with callers, gathers information and routes calls to the appropriate recipients.
  • internet - The internet, sometimes simply called 'the net,' is a worldwide system of interconnected computer networks and electronic devices that communicate with each other using an established set of protocols.
  • Internet Explorer (IE) - Internet Explorer (IE) is a web browser that formerly came bundled with the Microsoft Windows operating system.
  • Internet Information Services (IIS) - Internet Information Services (IIS) is a flexible, general-purpose web server from Microsoft that runs on Windows systems to serve requested HTML pages or files.
  • internet metering - Internet metering is a service model in which an internet service provider (ISP) keeps track of bandwidth use and charges users accordingly.
  • Internet Movie Database (IMDb) - The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database that provides information to consumers about movies, TV and film industry professionals.
  • Internet Protocol (IP) - The Internet Protocol (IP) is the method or protocol by which data is sent from one computer to another on the internet.
  • interoperability - Interoperability refers to the degree to which a software system, devices, applications or other entity can connect and communicate with other entities in a coordinated manner without effort from the end user.
  • intranet - An intranet is a private network contained within an enterprise that is used to securely share company information and computing resources among employees.
  • IP address (Internet Protocol address) - Internet Protocol (IP) address is a unique numerical identifier for every device or network that connects to the internet.
  • IP PBX (private branch exchange) - An IP PBX is a private branch exchange (telephone switching system within an enterprise) that switches calls between VoIP (voice over Internet Protocol or IP) users on local lines while allowing all users to share a certain number of external phone lines.
  • IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) - IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) is a general term for technologies, products and services that use the Internet Protocol's packet-switched connections to support voice calling, voicemail, video calling, video conferencing, faxing and instant messaging.
  • iPad - The iPad is a touchscreen tablet PC made by Apple.
  • IPv6 address - An IPv6 address is a 128-bit alphanumeric value that identifies an endpoint device in an Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) network.
  • IRL (in real life) - IRL (in real life) is an abbreviation used to explain when person is speaking about something real and outside the digital world of communication, gaming or virtual reality.
  • ISA Server - Microsoft's ISA Server (Internet Security and Acceleration Server) was the successor to Microsoft's Proxy Server 2.
  • iSCSI (Internet Small Computer System Interface) - ISCSI is a transport layer protocol that describes how Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) packets should be transported over a TCP/IP network.
  • IT distributor - An IT channel distributor is a business that acts as an intermediary between vendors and value-added resellers (VARs) or system integrators (SIs) in the distribution of software or hardware.
  • JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) - JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) is a text-based, human-readable data interchange format used to exchange data between web clients and web servers.
  • Ken Burns effect - Ken Burns effect is the use of still photographs along with zooming, panning and transitions such as fading as the base for video content.
  • LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) - LAMP is an open source Web development platform that uses Linux as the operating system, Apache as the Web server, MySQL as the relational database management system and PHP as the object-oriented scripting language.
  • LARP (Live Action Role Playing) - LARP (Live Action Role Playing), also called LARPing, is a character-driven type of gameplay that is conducted in the physical world.
  • Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) - Layer Two Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) is an extension of the Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) used by an internet service provider (ISP) to enable the operation of a virtual private network (VPN) over the internet.
  • LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) - LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a software protocol for enabling anyone to locate data about organizations, individuals and other resources such as files and devices in a network -- whether on the public internet or a corporate intranet.
  • LEAP (Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol) - LEAP (Lightweight Extensible Authentication Protocol) is a Cisco-proprietary version of EAP, the authentication protocol used in wireless networks and Point-to-Point connections.
  • leet speak (leet) - Leet speak, also known as simply leet, is the substitution of a word's letters with numbers or special characters.
  • lights-out management (LOM) - Lights-out management (LOM) is a form of out-of-band management.
  • Link Control Protocol (LCP) - In computer networking, Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) provides a standard way to transport multiprotocol data over point-to-point links; within PPP, Link Control Protocol (LCP) establishes, configures and tests data link internet connections.
  • load balancing - Load balancing is a technique used to distribute network traffic across a pool of servers known as a server farm.
  • loose coupling - Loose coupling is an approach to interconnecting the components in a system, network or software application so that those components, also called elements, depend on each other to the least extent practicable.
  • Luddite - A Luddite is a person resistant to increased industrialization or new technologies, especially computers.
  • meta description tag - A meta description tag is a snippet of HTML code in a web page header that summarizes the content that's on the web page.
  • metadata - Often referred to as data that describes other data, metadata is structured reference data that helps to sort and identify attributes of the information it describes.
  • Microsoft - Microsoft is the largest vendor of computer software in the world.
  • Microsoft Store - The Microsoft Store -- formerly called the Windows Store -- is an online marketplace for consumers to buy and download a variety of items.
  • Microsoft Windows Update - Microsoft Windows Update is a security service for Windows users that, once activated, automatically searches for and installs updates.
  • middleware - Middleware is software that bridges the gap between applications and operating systems by providing a method for communication and data management.
  • Millennials (Generation Y) - Millennials, also known as Generation Y, is a demographic that includes individuals who reached adulthood around the turn of the 21st century.
Networking
  • SD-WAN security

    SD-WAN security refers to the practices, protocols and technologies protecting data and resources transmitted across ...

  • net neutrality

    Net neutrality is the concept of an open, equal internet for everyone, regardless of content consumed or the device, application ...

  • network scanning

    Network scanning is a procedure for identifying active devices on a network by employing a feature or features in the network ...

Security
CIO
  • strategic management

    Strategic management is the ongoing planning, monitoring, analysis and assessment of all necessities an organization needs to ...

  • IT budget

    IT budget is the amount of money spent on an organization's information technology systems and services. It includes compensation...

  • project scope

    Project scope is the part of project planning that involves determining and documenting a list of specific project goals, ...

HRSoftware
  • director of employee engagement

    Director of employee engagement is one of the job titles for a human resources (HR) manager who is responsible for an ...

  • digital HR

    Digital HR is the digital transformation of HR services and processes through the use of social, mobile, analytics and cloud (...

  • employee onboarding and offboarding

    Employee onboarding involves all the steps needed to get a new employee successfully deployed and productive, while offboarding ...

Customer Experience
  • chatbot

    A chatbot is a software or computer program that simulates human conversation or "chatter" through text or voice interactions.

  • martech (marketing technology)

    Martech (marketing technology) refers to the integration of software tools, platforms, and applications designed to streamline ...

  • transactional marketing

    Transactional marketing is a business strategy that focuses on single, point-of-sale transactions.

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