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Project management

Terms related to project management, including definitions about project management methodologies and tools.

70 - MAR

  • 70 percent rule for productivity - According to the 70 percent rule, which has its roots in athletics, employees are most productive when a majority of their time is spent working at a less intense pace.
  • ABC analysis (Pareto analysis) - ABC analysis, also known as Pareto analysis, is a method used to categorize something according to its importance or value in a given context.
  • accountability - Accountability is an assurance that an individual or an organization is evaluated on its performance or behavior related to something for which it is responsible.
  • acquisition plan - An acquisition plan, in the context of procurement, is a business document specifying all relevant considerations for the processes involved with acquiring goods, services or other organizations.
  • action item - An action item is a discrete task that must be accomplished, usually by a single individual or a small team or group.
  • actionable intelligence - Actionable intelligence is information that can be followed up on, with the further implication that a strategic plan should be undertaken to make positive use of the information gathered.
  • ad hoc - Ad hoc is an adjective used to describe things that are created on the spot, usually for a single use.
  • ad inventory (advertising inventory) - Ad inventory is the total amount of space that a publisher has available for advertisements at any given time.
  • adhocracy - Adhocracy is a business management and corporate culture model based the ability to adapt quickly to changing conditions.
  • adulting - Adulting is the assumption of tasks and behaviors associated with normal grown-up life, along with the implication that the individual in question does not particularly identify as an adult.
  • ASAP, ALAP and ATAP - ASAP, ATAP and ALAP are acronyms that stand for, respectively, as soon as possible, as timely as possible and as late as possible.
  • availability bias - In psychology, the availability bias is the human tendency to rely on information that comes readily to mind when evaluating situations or making decisions.
  • barter economy - A barter economy is a cashless economic system in which services and goods are traded at negotiated rates.
  • billable hours - Billable hours are the amounts of an employee’s work time that can be charged to a client.
  • block diagram - A block diagram is a visual representation of a system that uses simple, labeled blocks that represent single or multiple items, entities or concepts, connected by lines to show relationships between them.
  • boil the ocean - To boil the ocean, in a business context, is to increase the scope of a project or task until it is practically impossible to accomplish as envisioned.
  • BOOT (build, own, operate and transfer) - BOOT (build, own, operate, transfer) is a project funding model based on a financial agreement between a private contractor and a public organization.
  • broken window theory - Broken window theory is the concept that each problem that goes unattended in a given environment affects people's attitude toward that environment and leads to more problems.
  • build-measure-learn (BML) - Build-measure-learn (BML) is a process of building a product, measuring consumer metrics and learning from them to better respond to customer needs and improve the product for the ultimate sustainability of the company.
  • burn-in - Burn-in is a test in which a system or component is made to run for an extended period of time to detect problems.
  • bus number (What's your bus number?) - In project management, the bus number is the number of team members whose loss would endanger a project.
  • business case - A business case is a written or verbal value proposition that is intended to educate a decision maker and convince them to take some kind of action.
  • business model - A business model is the conceptual structure supporting the viability of a business, including its purpose, its goals and its plans for achieving them.
  • business plan - A business plan is a document demonstrating the feasibility of a prospective new business and providing a roadmap for its first several years of operation.
  • business process automation (BPA) - Business process automation (BPA) is the use of advanced technology to complete business processes with minimal human intervention.
  • CALMS - CALMS is a conceptual framework for the integration of development and operations (DevOps) teams, functions and systems within an organization.
  • case study - In a business context, a case study is a documented implementation of something, such as a practice, a product or a service.
  • center of excellence (CoE) - A center of excellence (CoE) is a team of skilled knowledge workers whose mission is to provide best practices for a particular area of interest.
  • Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) - The Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) is a vendor-neutral, entry-level certification to help individuals acquire project management (PM) skills.
  • change control - Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.
  • change log - A change log is a record of requests for change (RFCs) submitted for all changes in a service.
  • change request - A change request is a formal proposal for an alteration to some product or system.
  • channel strategy - A channel strategy is a vendor's plan for moving a product or a service through the chain of commerce to the end customer.
  • Chief Operating Officer (COO) - A Chief Operating Officer (COO) is the corporate executive who oversees ongoing business operations within the company.
  • chief procurement officer (CPO) - The chief procurement officer, or CPO, leads an organization's procurement department and oversees the acquisitions of goods and services made by the organization.
  • chief risk officer (CRO) - The chief risk officer (CRO) is the corporate executive tasked with assessing and mitigating significant competitive, regulatory and technological threats to an enterprise's capital and earnings.
  • Chief Technology Officer (CTO) - The chief technology officer (CTO) is the individual within an organization who oversees the current technology and creates relevant policy.
  • class diagram - A class diagram is an illustration of the relationships and source code dependencies among classes in the Unified Modeling Language (UML).
  • collaboration diagram - A collaboration diagram, also known as a communication diagram, is an illustration of the relationships and interactions among software objects in the Unified Modeling Language (UML).
  • collaboration platform - A collaboration platform is a category of business software that adds broad social networking capabilities to work processes.
  • communication plan - A communication plan is a policy-driven approach to providing company stakeholders with certain information.
  • CompTIA Project+ - CompTIA Project + is the Computing Technology Industry Association’s certification program designed to demonstrate validated learning and skills in project management.
  • cone of uncertainty - The cone of uncertainty is a project management tool that explains why estimates become more accurate over the span of a project's lifecycle.
  • constraint (project constraint) - A project constraint is any limit or restriction applied to a project.
  • contingency budget (cost contingency) - Contingency, in the context of project management, is an amount of money that is included to cover potential events that are not specifically accounted for in a cost estimate.
  • continuous integration (CI) - Continuous integration (CI) is a software engineering practice in which frequent, isolated changes are immediately tested and reported on when they are added to a larger code base.
  • contract theory - Contract theory is the study of how people and organizations develop legal agreements in situations with uncertain conditions, unknown factors and information asymmetry.
  • corporate culture model - A corporate culture model is the organizing principle behind the values, beliefs and attitudes that characterize a company and guide its practices.
  • corporate performance management (CPM) - Corporate performance management (CPM) is a term used to describe the various processes and methodologies involved in aligning an organization's strategies and goals to its plans and executions in order to control the success of the company.
  • cost management - Cost management is the process of planning and controlling the budget of a business.
  • crisis management - Crisis management is the application of strategies designed to help an organization deal with a sudden and significant negative event.
  • critical path method (CPM) - The critical path method (CPM) is a step-by-step project management technique for process planning that defines critical and non-critical tasks with the goal of preventing project schedule problems and process bottlenecks.
  • data-driven decision management (DDDM) - Data-driven decision management (DDDM) is an approach to business governance that values actions that can be backed up with verifiable data.
  • deductive argument - A deductive argument is a logic construct with two or more premises and a conclusion where if the premises are true then the conclusion must also be true.
  • demand planning - Demand planning is the process of forecasting the demand for a product or service so it can be produced and delivered more efficiently and to the satisfaction of customers.
  • device mesh - A device mesh is an ad hoc network in the internet of things (IoT).
  • discrete event simulation (DES) - Discrete event simulation (DES) is the process of codifying the behavior of a complex system as an ordered sequence of well-defined events.
  • distribution requirements planning (DRP) - Distribution requirements planning (DRP) is a time-based systematic process to make the delivery of goods more efficient by determining which goods, in what quantities, and at what location are required to meet anticipated demand.
  • distributive bargaining - Distributive bargaining is an adversarial type of negotiation in which it is assumed that any gain of a competitor is a loss to the other party.
  • distributor agreement (distribution agreement) - A distributor agreement, also known as a distribution agreement, is a contract between channel partners that stipulates the responsibilities of both parties.
  • DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) - DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) is Six Sigma tool for improving an existing process.
  • dynamic analysis - Dynamic analysis is the testing and evaluation of a program based on execution with selected data.
  • Eisenhower Matrix - The Eisenhower Matrix is a time management tool for prioritizing tasks.
  • empiricism - Empiricism is a philosophical theory applicable in many disciplines, including science and software development, that human knowledge comes predominantly from experiences gathered through the five senses.
  • employee productivity - Employee productivity is an assessment of the efficiency of a worker or group of workers.
  • end of life (EOL) - End of life (EOL), in the context of manufacturing and product lifecycles, is the final stages of a product’s existence.
  • equilibrium price - An equilibrium price, also known as a market-clearing price, is the consumer cost assigned to some product or service such that supply and demand are equal, or close to equal.
  • executive sponsor - An executive sponsor is a C-level administrator who has a vested interest in seeing a project to completion.
  • exit interview - An exit interview is a meeting between management representatives and someone who is leaving an organization.
  • fail fast - Fail fast is a philosophy that values the development or implementation of many small experimental products, changes or approaches before committing large amounts of time or resources.
  • Fibonacci sequence - The Fibonacci sequence is a set of integers (the Fibonacci numbers) that starts with a zero, followed by a one, then by another one, and then by a series of steadily increasing numbers.
  • fist to five (fist of five) - Fist to five, or fist of five, is a consensus-building technique used by Agile software development teams to poll team members and come to an agreement.
  • fixed price - A fixed price is a non-negotiable sum charged for a product, service or piece of work.
  • float (project float, slack) - In project management, float or slack is the time span between the completion of the last task on the critical path and the finish date for the project.
  • fudge factor - A fudge factor is an element inserted into a calculation, formula or model to allow for error or uncertainty.
  • Gantt chart - A Gantt chart is a horizontal bar chart developed as a production control tool in 1917 by Henry L.
  • garbage in, garbage out (GIGO) - GIGO (garbage in, garbage out) is a concise expression of a concept common to computer science and mathematics: the quality of output is determined by the quality of the input.
  • gift economy - A gift economy is one in which services or goods are given without an agreement as to a suitable payment or trade to be made in return.
  • gig economy - A gig economy is a free market system in which temporary positions are common and organizations hire independent workers for short-term commitments.
  • gold plating - Gold plating is the practice of making changes to a project that are outside of the original agreed-upon scope.
  • hierarchical corporate culture - A hierarchical corporate culture is an organizational model based on clearly defined corporate levels and structures.
  • Hofstadter's law - Hofstadter’s law is the observation that “It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's Law.
  • Hyperledger - Hyperledger is an open source project created to support the development of blockchain-based distributed ledgers.
  • IDOV methodology (identify, design, optimize, verify) - The IDOV methodology (Identify, Design, Optimize and Verify methodology) is a component of the Six Sigma management system intended to guide processes involved in creating a new new product, service or business process.
  • Infinite Monkey Theorem - The Infinite Monkey Theorem is a proposition that an unlimited number of monkeys, given typewriters and sufficient time, will eventually produce a particular text, such as Hamlet or even the complete works of Shakespeare.
  • information radiator - An information radiator, also known as a Big Visible Chart (BVC), is a large graphical representation kept plainly in sight within an agile development team’s shared workspace.
  • intelligent workflow - Intelligent workflow is an orchestration method that integrates analytics, AI, machine learning and automation.
  • invitation to tender (ITT) - An invitation to tender (ITT) is the initial step in competitive tendering, in which suppliers and contractors are invited to provide offers for supply or service contracts.
  • IT chargeback system - An IT chargeback system is an accounting strategy that applies the costs of IT services, hardware or software to the business unit in which they are used.
  • IT consultant - A consultant is an experienced individual in a given field who provides expert advice for a fee.
  • IT financial management - IT financial management is the oversight of expenditures required to deliver IT products and services.
  • IT project management - Every IT project should begin with two questions: What business problem are we trying to solve? And does everyone agree it's worth the effort to solve it?.
  • IT project manager - An IT project manager is a professional charged with overseeing the process of planning, executing and delegating responsibilities around an organization's information technology (IT) pursuits and goals.
  • IT strategist (information technology strategist) - An IT strategist (information technology strategist) is someone in an organization who is given the responsibility and authority to establish initiatives that affect the organization's IT and business strategy.
  • iteration - In agile software development, an iteration is a single development cycle, usually measured as one week or two weeks.
  • ITIL v3 - ITIL v3 is the third version of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library, a globally recognized collection of best practices for managing information technology (IT).
  • law of unintended consequences - The law of unintended consequences is a frequently-observed phenomenon in which any action has results that are not part of the actor's purpose.
  • Mandela Effect - The Mandela Effect is an observed phenomenon in which a large segment of the population misremembers a significant event or shares a memory of an event that did not actually occur.
Networking
  • network traffic

    Network traffic is the amount of data that moves across a network during any given time.

  • dynamic and static

    In general, dynamic means 'energetic, capable of action and/or change, or forceful,' while static means 'stationary or fixed.'

  • MAC address (media access control address)

    A MAC address (media access control address) is a 12-digit hexadecimal number assigned to each device connected to the network.

Security
  • Trojan horse

    In computing, a Trojan horse is a program downloaded and installed on a computer that appears harmless, but is, in fact, ...

  • quantum key distribution (QKD)

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a secure communication method for exchanging encryption keys only known between shared parties.

  • Common Body of Knowledge (CBK)

    In security, the Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) is a comprehensive framework of all the relevant subjects a security professional...

CIO
  • benchmark

    A benchmark is a standard or point of reference people can use to measure something else.

  • spatial computing

    Spatial computing broadly characterizes the processes and tools used to capture, process and interact with 3D data.

  • organizational goals

    Organizational goals are strategic objectives that a company's management establishes to outline expected outcomes and guide ...

HRSoftware
  • talent acquisition

    Talent acquisition is the strategic process employers use to analyze their long-term talent needs in the context of business ...

  • employee retention

    Employee retention is the organizational goal of keeping productive and talented workers and reducing turnover by fostering a ...

  • hybrid work model

    A hybrid work model is a workforce structure that includes employees who work remotely and those who work on site, in a company's...

Customer Experience
  • database marketing

    Database marketing is a systematic approach to the gathering, consolidation and processing of consumer data.

  • cost per engagement (CPE)

    Cost per engagement (CPE) is an advertising pricing model in which digital marketing teams and advertisers only pay for ads when ...

  • B2C (Business2Consumer or Business-to-Consumer)

    B2C -- short for business-to-consumer -- is a retail model where products move directly from a business to the end user who has ...

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