Browse Definitions :

Browse Definitions by Alphabet

W3C - WER

  • W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) - The W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) is an international organization that creates standards for the World Wide Web.
  • WAG (estimate) - A WAG (wild-ass guess) is an estimate for how long it will take to complete a project.
  • WAIS (Wide Area Information Servers) - WAIS (Wide Area Information Servers) is an Internet system in which specialized subject databases are created at multiple server locations, kept track of by a directory of servers at one location, and made accessible for searching by users with WAIS client programs.
  • wait state - A wait state is a situation in which a computer program or processor is waiting for the completion of some event before resuming activity.
  • Wake on LAN - Wake on LAN is a technology that allows a network professional to remotely power on a computer or to wake it up from sleep mode.
  • wake word - A wake word is a phrase spoken to the Amazon Echo hands-free speaker and virtual assistant that causes the device to "wake up" and process a user's request.
  • walking skeleton - A walking skeleton, in a software development context, is a minimal initial implementation of an application that includes and connects the major components of the system's architecture.
  • wall time (real-world time or wall-clock time) - Wall time, also called real-world time or wall-clock time, refers to elapsed time as determined by a chronometer such as a wristwatch or wall clock.
  • walled garden - On the internet, a walled garden is an environment that controls the user's access to network-based content and services.
  • wallet - A wallet is a small software program used for online purchase transactions.
  • WAN (wide area network) - A wide area network (WAN) is a geographically distributed telecommunications network that interconnects multiple local area networks (LANs).
  • WAN optimization (WAN acceleration) - WAN optimization -- also known as WAN acceleration -- is a collection of technologies and techniques used to improve the efficiency of data transfer across a wide area network (WAN) between organizations' centralized data centers and their remote locations.
  • WAN optimization vocabulary quiz - Test your knowledge of essential WAN optimization terms with our 10-question quiz.
  • WannaCry ransomware - The WannaCry ransomware is a worm that spreads by exploiting vulnerabilities in the Windows operating system.
  • war driving (access point mapping) - War driving, also called access point mapping, is the act of locating and possibly exploiting connections to wireless local area networks while driving around a city or elsewhere.
  • warchalking (war chalking) - Warchalking is a grass roots effort to create a standard iconography for public Wi-Fi access.
  • Warehouse control system (WCS) - Warehouse control system (WCS) is a software application for orchestrating activity flow within a warehouses and distribution center.
  • warehouse management system (WMS) - A warehouse management system (WMS) consists of software and processes that allow organizations to control and administer warehouse operations from the time goods or materials enter a warehouse until they move out.
  • warez - Warez (pronounced as though spelled "wares" or possibly by some pronounced like the city of "Juarez") is a term used by software "pirates" to describe software that has been stripped of its copy-protection and made available on the Internet for downloading.
  • warm site - A warm site is a type of facility an organization uses to recover its technology infrastructure when its primary data center goes down.
  • warranty - Warranties provide customers with legally-ensured service replacement or correction of issues insofar as the warranty stipulates in its conditions, for the duration of its term.
  • Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulation (WEEE) - Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Regulation (WEEE) is a directive in the European Union that designates safe and responsible collection, recycling and recovery procedures for all types of electronic waste.
  • waste heat recovery - Waste heat recovery is the collection of heat created as an undesired by-product of the operation of a piece of equipment or machinery to fill a desired purpose elsewhere.
  • watchdog timer (WDT) - A watchdog timer (WDT) is a device or electronic card that performs a specific operation after a certain period of time if something goes wrong with an electronic system and the system does not recover on its own.
  • water cooling - Water cooling, also called liquid cooling, is a method used to lower the temperature of computer processor units (CPUs), and sometimes graphics processor units (GPUs).
  • water-Scrum-fall - Water-Scrum-fall is a hybrid approach to application lifecycle management that combines waterfall and Scrum development methodologies.
  • waterfall model - The waterfall model is a linear, sequential approach to the software development life cycle (SDLC) that is popular in software engineering and product development and emphasizes a logical progression of steps.
  • watering hole attack - A watering hole attack is a security exploit in which the attacker seeks to compromise a specific group of end users by infecting websites that members of the group are known to visit.
  • watt - The watt (abbreviated W) is the International System of Units' (SI) standard unit of power (energy per unit time), the equivalent of one jouleper second.
  • watt-hour (Wh) - The watt-hour, which is symbolized Wh, is a unit of energy equivalent to one watt of power expended for one hour of time.
  • Wave file - A Wave file is an audio file format, created by Microsoft, that has become a standard PC audio file format for everything from system and game sounds to CD-quality audio.
  • wave number - The term wave number refers to the number of complete wave cycles of an electromagnetic field (EM field) that exist in one meter (1 m) of linear space.
  • waveform - A waveform is a representation of how alternating current (AC) varies with time.
  • waveguide - A waveguide is an electromagnetic feed line used in microwave communications, broadcasting, and radar installations.
  • wavelength - Wavelength is the distance between identical points (adjacent crests) in the adjacent cycles of a waveform signal propagated in space or along a wire.
  • wavelet - A wavelet is a mathematical function useful in digital signal processing and image compression.
  • waving a dead chicken - Waving a dead chicken is a slang expression for an effort to solve a problem even when the effort is expected to be futile.
  • Waymo - Waymo is a systems engineering company that specializes in developing autonomous driving car technologies and a subsidiary of Alphabet, Google’s parent company.
  • wbadmin - Wbadmin is an elevated command prompt that allows administrators or backup operators to backup and restore an operating system (OS), volume, file, folder or application.
  • weak tie theory - Weak tie theory is the proposition that acquaintances are likely to be more influential than close friends, particularly in social networks.
  • weaponized information - Weaponized information is a message or content piece that is designed to affect the recipient's perception about something or someone in a way that is not warranted.
  • wear leveling - Wear leveling is a process that is designed to extend the life of solid-state storage devices.
  • wearable computer - A wearable computer is any small technological device capable of storing and processing data that can be worn on the body.
  • wearable technology - Wearable technology is any kind of electronic device designed to be worn on the user's body.
  • wearables OS (wearables operating system) - A wearable OS is an operating system designed or refactored to satisfy the requirements of wearable computers, which can be significantly from one type of device to another and also different from the requirements of both desktop and mobile devices.
  • Web 2.0 - Web 2.0 are websites and applications that make use of user-generated content for end-users.
  • Web 3.0 (Web3) - Web 3.0 (Web3) is the third generation of the evolution of web technologies.
  • web analytics - Web analytics is the process of analyzing the behavior of visitors to a website.
  • Web application (Web app) - A Web application (Web app) is an application program that is stored on a remote server and delivered over the Internet through a browser interface.
  • web application development - Web app development is the creation of application programs that reside on remote servers and are delivered to the user’s device over the Internet.
  • Web application firewall (WAF) - A web application firewall (WAF) is a firewall that monitors, filters and blocks data packets as they travel to and from a website or web application.
  • Web Application Proxy - Web Application Proxy is a service in Windows Server 2012 R2 that allows end users to access applications from outside the corporate network on any device.
  • Web Application Security Consortium (WASC) - The Web Application Security Consortium (WASC) is a worldwide organization devoted to the establishment, refinement and promotion of Internet security standards.
  • Web based project management software - Web based project management software is the collection of programs, processes and information that is used to manage various phases of a project and that is accessible on the Internet.
  • Web Bluetooth - Web Bluetooth is an API that enables interaction with Bluetooth devices through web browsers.
  • Web bug (Web beacon) - A Web bug, also known as a Web beacon, is a file object (usually a graphic image such as a transparent GIF) that is placed on a Web page or in an e-mail message to monitor user behavior.
  • web conferencing - Web conferencing is a form of communication that enables real-time sharing of computer screens, applications or web-based content among two or more devices.
  • web content management system (WCMS) - A web content management system (WCMS) is a type of content management system (CMS) that provides an organization with a way to manage digital information on a website through creating and maintaining content without prior knowledge of web programming or markup languages.
  • web crawler - A web crawler, crawler or web spider, is a computer program that's used to search and automatically index website content and other information over the internet.
  • web development framework (WDF) - A web development framework is a set of resources and tools for software developers to build and manage web applications, web services and websites.
  • web offset printing - Web offset is a form of offset printing in which a continuous roll of paper is fed through the printing press.
  • Web presence - A Web presence (or Web site) is a collection of Web files on a particular subject that includes a beginning file called a home page.
  • Web Proxy Autodiscovery (WPAD) - Web Proxy Autodiscovery (WPAD) is a proposed Internet protocol that allows a client, such as a Web browser or a streaming media application, to automatically locate and interface with cache services in a network so that information can be delivered more quickly to the user.
  • Web ring (Webring) - A Web ring (or Webring) is a way of interlinking related Web sites so that you can visit each site one after the other, eventually (if you keep going) returning to the first Web site.
  • Web self-service - Web self-service is a type of electronic support (e-support) that allows customers and employees to access information and perform routine tasks over the Internet, without requiring any interaction with a representative of an enterprise.
  • web server - A web server is software and hardware that uses HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) and other protocols to respond to client requests made over the World Wide Web.
  • web server security - Web server security is the protection of information assets that can be accessed from a Web server.
  • web service orchestration - Service orchestration is the coordination or integration of several services and exposing them as a single service.
  • web services - Web services are a type of internet software that use standardized messaging protocols and are made available from an application service provider's web server for use by a client or other web-based programs.
  • Web site - This definition is also listed under presence, site and Website.
  • Web slate - A Web slate is a wireless Internet appliance that consists of a liquid crystal display (LCD) with a touch screen that allows the user to view and interact with Web pages.
  • Web stack - A Web stack is the collection of software required for Web development.
  • Web texting - Web texting is two-way text messaging from the Web to a handheld mobile device, usually a cellular phone.
  • Web year - A Web year is the length of time it takes for Internet technology to evolve as much as technology in another environment might evolve in a calendar year.
  • Web-Based Enterprise Management (WBEM) - Web-Based Enterprise Management (WBEM) is a set of industry standards that an enterprise can use to manage its information operations in the distributed computing environment of the Internet.
  • Web-Braille - Web-Braille is a delivery system that allows content to be read on a Braille display or transmitted to a Braille embosser.
  • WebAuthn API - The Web Authentication API (WebAuthn API) is a credential management application program interface (API) that lets web applications authenticate users without storing their passwords on servers.
  • WebGL - WebGL is a graphics application programming interface (API) created for use in web applications.
  • webhook - A webhook is a software architecture approach that allows applications and services to submit a web-based notification to other applications whenever a specific event occurs.
  • Webification - Webification (sometimes seen with a lower case w) is the act of converting content from its original format into a format capable of being displayed on the World Wide Web.
  • Webify - The act of converting content from its original format into a format capable of being displayed on the World Wide Web.
  • webinar - A webinar is an educational, informative or instructional presentation that is made available online, usually as video or audio with slides.
  • weblog - A blog, short for weblog, is a frequently updated web page used for personal commentary or business content.
  • WebLogic - Oracle WebLogic Server is a leading e-commerce online transaction processing (OLTP) platform, developed to connect users in distributed computing production environments and to facilitate the integration of mainframe applications with distributed corporate data and applications.
  • webmaster - A webmaster is a person who creates and manages the content and organization of a website, manages the computer server and technical programming aspects of a website or does both.
  • webMethods - webMethods is a company that specializes in business process integration software for the enterprise.
  • WebOps (Web operations) - WebOps, short for Web operations, is the area of IT systems management that deals with the complexities of Web-based applications and the systems that support them.
  • webOS - WebOS is an LG-owned, Linux based, smart TV operating system that is set up to allow control and access of LG Smart TV’s more advanced features and connected devices through a graphical user interface (GUI).
  • WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communications) - WebRTC (Web Real-Time Communications) is an open source project that enables real-time voice, text and video communications capabilities between web browsers and devices.
  • website security question - An internet security question is a backup measure used to authenticate the user of a website or an application in the event that they have forgotten their user name and/or password.
  • WebSocket - WebSocket is a communications protocol for a persistent, bi-directional, full duplex TCP connection from a user’s web browser to a server.
  • Websphere MQ - Websphere MQ, formerly known as MQ (message queue) series, is an IBM standard for program-to-program messaging across multiple platforms.
  • WebTV - WebTV, now owned by Microsoft, was one of the first entries in the much publicized convergence of the World Wide Web with television.
  • Weebly - Weebly is a freemium website creation and Web-hosting service.
  • weenie - On bullet board systems (BBS) and in Internet chatting groups, a weenie is an avid but immature participant who disrupts orderly conversation.
  • weight (w) - Weight (symbolized w) is a quantity representing the force exerted on a particle or object by an acceleration field, particularly the gravitational field of the Earth at the surface.
  • weighted fair queueing (WFQ) - Weighted fair queueing (WFQ) is a method of automatically smoothing out the flow of data in packet-switched communication networks by sorting packets to minimize the average latency and prevent exaggerated discrepancies between the transmission efficiency afforded to narrowband versus broadband signals.
  • Weird and wonderful geekspeak: Do you speak Geek? - Test yourself.
  • well-known port numbers - The well-known port numbers are the port numbers that are reserved for assignment by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) for use by the application end points that communicate using the Internet's Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or the User Datagram Protocol (UDP).
  • Werner Heisenberg - Werner Heisenberg (1901 - 1976), one of the greatest physicists of the twentieth century, is best known for his contributions to quantum mechanics, specifically for the uncertainty principle in quantum theory.
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