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Electronics

Terms related to electronics, including definitions about electrical components and words and phrases about computers, laptops parts, digital cameras, televisions and home appliances.

FIE - PHA

  • field of view (FOV) - Field of view (FOV) is the open, observable area a person can see through their eyes or via an optical device, such as a camera.
  • field-effect transistor (FET) - A field-effect transistor (FET) is a type of transistor commonly used for weak-signal amplification (for example, for amplifying wireless signals).
  • field-replaceable unit (FRU) - In computer systems, a field-replaceable unit (FRU) is a circuit board or part that can be removed and replaced without having to send the entire product or system to a repair facility.
  • flash storage - Flash storage is any type of drive, repository or system that uses flash memory to keep data for an extended period of time.
  • Flat-panel TV Guide - Benefits of flat-panel TVs | Flat-panel features to considerA quick comparison of LCD, LED, OLED and plasma TVsFlat-panel TV technologies: LCD | LED | Plasma | OLEDMore informationA flat-panel TV is a television set that uses one of several different technologies for display in a flat, thin format.
  • floating gate transistor (FGT) - A floating gate transistor (FGT) is a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology capable of holding an electrical charge in a memory device that is used to store data.
  • frequency - For an oscillating or varying current, frequency is the number of complete cycles per second in alternating current direction.
  • frequency jammer - Frequency jamming is the disruption of radio signals through use of an over-powered signal in the same frequency range.
  • frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) - Frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) transmission is the repeated switching of the carrier frequency during radio transmission to reduce interference and avoid interception.
  • functional requirements - Functional requirements are the desired operations of a program, or system as defined in software development and systems engineering.
  • gallium arsenide (GaAs) - Gallium arsenide (chemical formula GaAs) is a semiconductor compound used in some diode s, field-effect transistors (FETs), and integrated circuits (ICs).
  • gallium arsenide field-effect transistor (GaAsFET) - A gallium arsenide field-effect transistor (GaAsFET) is a specialized type of field-effect transistor (FET) that is used in amplifier circuits at very-high, ultra-high, and microwave radio frequencies.
  • geo-fencing (geofencing) - Geo-fencing is a feature in a software program that uses the global positioning system (GPS) or radio frequency identification (RFID) to define geographical boundaries.
  • gigabit interface converter (GBIC) - A gigabit interface converter (GBIC) is a transceiver that converts electric currents (digital highs and lows) to optical signals, and optical signals to digital electric currents.
  • glue logic - Glue logic is a special form of digital circuitry that allows different types of logic chips or circuits to work together by acting as an interface between them.
  • graphic equalizer - A graphic equalizer is a high-fidelity audio control that allows the user to see graphically and control individually a number of different frequency bands in a stereophonic system.
  • green networking - Green networking is the practice of selecting energy-efficient networking technologies and products, and minimizing resource use whenever possible.
  • harmonic - A harmonic is a wave or signal whose frequency is an integral (whole number) multiple of the frequency of the same reference signal or wave.
  • HDTV (high definition television) - HDTV (high definition television) is a television display technology that provides picture quality similar to 35 mm.
  • henry (H) - The henry (symbolized H) is the Standard International (SI) unit of inductance.
  • hertz - Hertz is a unit of frequency (of change in state or cycle in a sound wave, alternating current, or other cyclical waveform) of one cycle per second.
  • hole - In physics, a hole is an electric charge carrier with a positive charge, equal in magnitude but opposite in polarity to the charge on the electron.
  • horsepower (hp) - Horsepower (hp) is a unit of measurement in the foot-pound-second (fps or ft-lb/s) or English system, sometimes used to express the rate at which mechanical energy is expended.
  • hydraulics - Hydraulics is a mechanical function that operates through the force of liquid pressure.
  • IBM Roadrunner - Roadrunner is the fastest supercomputer in the world, twice as fast as Blue Gene and six times as fast as any of the other current supercomputers.
  • impedance - Impedance, denoted Z, is an expression of the opposition that an electronic component, circuit, or system offers to alternating and/or direct electric current.
  • inductor - An inductor is a passive electronic component that storesenergy in the form of a magnetic field.
  • infrared radiation (IR) - Infrared radiation (IR), sometimes referred to simply as infrared, is a region of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum where wavelengths range from about 700 nanometers (nm) to 1 millimeter (mm).
  • infrared transmission - Infrared transmission refers to energy in the region of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum at wavelength s longer than those of visible light, but shorter than those of radio.
  • integrated circuit (IC) - An integrated circuit (IC), sometimes called a chip, microchip or microelectronic circuit, is a semiconductor wafer on which thousands or millions of tiny resistors, capacitors, diodes and transistors are fabricated.
  • intellectual property core (IP core) - An intellectual property core (IP core) is a functional block of logic or data used to make a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) or application-specific integrated circuit for a product.
  • intelligent system - An intelligent system is an advanced computer system that can gather, analyze and respond to the data it collects from its surrounding environment.
  • interlaced display - An interlaced display, or interlaced scan video, is when a video only changes every other row of pixels in the image at each screen refresh.
  • International System of Units (SI) - The International System of Units is a global standard for expressing the magnitudes or quantities of important natural phenomena.
  • inverse-square law - The inverse-square law is a principle that expresses the way radiant energy propagates through space.
  • iPhone - The iPhone is a smartphone made by Apple that combines a computer, iPod, digital camera and cellular phone into one device with a touchscreen interface.
  • IR LED (infrared light-emitting diode) - An IR LED (infrared light emitting diode) is a solid state lighting (SSL) device that emits light in the infrared range of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum.
  • joule - The joule (pronounced DJOOL) is the standard unit of energy in electronics and general scientific applications.
  • judder - Judder is a television screen artifact that occurs when content recorded on film is shown on a television with a 60Hz refresh rate.
  • kHz (kilohertz) - The kilohertz, abbreviated kHz, is a unit of alternating current (AC) or electromagnetic (EM) wave frequency equal to one thousand hertz (1,000 Hz).
  • kill switch - A kill switch in an IT context is a mechanism used to shut down or disable a device or program.
  • Kindle Fire - Kindle Fire is a low-priced tablet computer from Amazon.
  • Kinect - Kinect is Microsoft’s motion gaming system for the Xbox 360.
  • laser - A laser is a coherent and focused beam of photons; coherent, in this context, means that it is all one wavelength, unlike ordinary light which showers on us in many wavelengths.
  • LCD TV - LCD TV is a television display technology based on a liquid crystal display.
  • LED light bulb - An LED light bulb is a solid-state lighting (SSL) device that fits in standard screw-in connections but uses LEDs (light-emitting diodes) to produce light.
  • LED TV (LED-backlight LCD television) - LED TV is a type of LCD television that uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to backlight the display instead of the cold cathode fluorescent lights (CCFLs) used in standard LCD televisions.
  • lithium polymer battery (LiPo) - A lithium-polymer battery (LiPo) is a rechargeable battery that, in the case of true LiPo, uses solid polymer for the electrolyte and lithium for one of the electrodes.
  • logic gate (AND, OR, XOR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XNOR) - A logic gate is an elementary building block of a digital circuit.
  • machine-to-machine (M2M) - Machine-to-machine, or M2M, is a broad label that can be used to describe any technology that enables networked devices to exchange information and perform actions without the manual assistance of humans.
  • magnetic field strength - Magnetic field strength is one of two ways that the intensity of a magnetic field can be expressed.
  • magnetomotive force (magnetic potential) - Magnetomotive force, also known as magnetic potential, is the property of certain substances or phenomena that gives rise to magnetic field s.
  • matter - Matter is a substance made up of various types of particles that occupies physical space and has inertia.
  • mechatronics - Mechatronics is a branch of engineering that focuses on designing, manufacturing and maintaining products that have both mechanical and electronic components.
  • memristor - A memristor is a type of resistor in which the flow of electrical current in an electronic circuit is determined by the amount of charge that has previously flowed through it.
  • MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) - A MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) is a miniature machine that has both mechanical and electronic components.
  • metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) - The metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET, pronounced MAWS-feht) is the most common type of field-effect transistor (FET).
  • MHz - The megahertz, abbreviated MHz, is a unit of alternating current (AC) or electromagnetic (EM) wave frequency equal to one million hertz (1,000,000 Hz).
  • micro USB - A micro USB is a miniaturized version of the Universal Serial Bus interface developed for connecting compact and mobile devices, such as smartphones, MP3 players, Global Positioning System devices, printers and digital cameras.
  • microcontroller (MCU) - A microcontroller is a compact integrated circuit designed to govern a specific operation in an embedded system.
  • microgrid - A microgrid is a small-scale power grid that can operate independently or collaboratively with other small power grids.
  • microphone - A microphone is a device that translates sound vibrations in the air into electronic signals and scribes them to a recording medium or over a loudspeaker.
  • MiFi - MiFi is a portable broadband device that allows multiple end users and mobile devices to share a 3G or 4G mobile broadband Internet connection and create an ad-hoc network.
  • milliampere hour (mAh) - A milliampere hour (mAh) is 1000th of an ampere hour (Ah).
  • MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) - MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) is an antenna technology for wireless communications in which multiple antennas are used at both the source (transmitter) and the destination (receiver).
  • modulation - Modulation is the process of converting data into radio waves by adding information to an electronic or optical carrier signal.
  • molecule - A molecule is two or more atoms connected by chemical bonds, which form the smallest unit of a substance that retains the composition and properties of that substance.
  • motherboard - A motherboard is the main printed circuit board (PCB) in a computer.
  • motion gaming (motion-controlled gaming) - A motion gaming system, sometimes called a motion-controlled gaming system, is one that allows players to interact with the system through body movements.
  • mu - The lowercase Greek letter µ (pronounced mu) generally represents the prefix multiplier 0.
  • NAND flash memory - NAND flash memory is a type of non-volatile storage technology that does not require power to retain data.
  • nanomachine (nanite) - A nanomachine, also called a nanite, is a mechanical or electromechanical device whose dimensions are measured in nanometers (millionths of a millimeter, or units of 10 -9 meter).
  • nanopaint - Nanopaint is a coating that can modify the properties of a surface or substance according to user-defined parameters.
  • natural user interface (NUI) - A natural user interface (NUI) is a system for human-computer interaction that the user operates through intuitive actions related to natural, everyday human behavior.
  • neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) - A neighborhood electric vehicle (NEV) is a type of battery-electric vehicle that is capable of traveling at a maximum speed of 25 mph and which has a maximum loaded weight of 3,000 lbs.
  • network node - A computer network is a system of computers and computing devices that are connected via communication links.
  • neutron - A neutron is a subatomic particle found in the nucleus of every atom except that of simple hydrogen.
  • no-fly zone - A no-fly zone is a geographic location over which aircraft cannot fly.
  • noise - Noise is unwanted electrical or electromagnetic energy that degrades the quality of signals and data.
  • non-interlaced display - A non-interlaced display is a screen display in which the lines are scanned progressively from the top to the bottom of the screen.
  • NOR flash memory - NOR flash memory is one of two types of non-volatile storage technologies.
  • NRZ (non-return-to-zero) - NRZ (non-return-to-zero) refers to a form of digital data transmission in which the binary low and high states, represented by numerals 0 and 1, are transmitted by specific and constant DC (direct-current) voltage s.
  • Nyquist theorem - The Nyquist theorem is also known as the sampling theorem.
  • Ohm's Law - Ohm's Law is the mathematical relationship among electric current, resistance, and voltage.
  • OLED TV - OLED TV is a television display technology based on the characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes (OLED).
  • omnidirectional antenna - An omnidirectional antenna is a wireless transmitting or receiving antenna that radiates or intercepts radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields equally well in all horizontal directions in a flat, two-dimensional (2D) geometric plane.
  • on-screen display (OSD) - An on-screen display (OSD) is a control panel superimposed on a computer monitor, mobile device, television screen or another electronic device display that enables users to select viewing options and/or adjust components of the display, such as brightness, contrast, and horizontal and vertical positioning.
  • optoisolator (optical coupler or optocoupler) - An optoisolator (also known as an optical coupler, photocoupler, optocoupler) is a semiconductor device that transfers an electrical signal between isolated circuits using light.
  • oscillator - An oscillator is a mechanical or electronic device that works on the principles of oscillation: a periodic fluctuation between two things based on changes in energy.
  • oscilloscope - An oscilloscope is a laboratory instrument commonly used to display and analyze the waveform of electronic signals.
  • Parallel ATA (Parallel Advanced Technology Attachment or PATA) - Parallel ATA (Parallel Advanced Technology Attachment or PATA) is a standard for connecting hard drives into computer systems.
  • pascal - The pascal (Pa) is the unit of pressure or stress in the International System of Units (SI).
  • passive keyless entry (PKE) - Passive keyless entry (PKE) is an automotive locking system that operates automatically when the holder is in proximity to the vehicle.
  • peak-to-peak (pk-pk) - Peak-to-peak (pk-pk) is the difference between the highest and the lowest values in a waveform.
  • permittivity (electric permittivity) - Permittivity (electric permittivity) is defined as the ratio of electric displacement to the electric field intensity.
  • permittivity of free space - The permittivity of free space is a physical constant that reflects the ability of electrical fields to pass through a classical vacuum.
  • personal drone - A personal drone, also known as a hobby or consumer drone, is an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) designed for the mass market.
  • PFC (power factor correction or power factor controller) - PFC (power factor correction; also known as power factor controller) is a feature included in some computer and other power supply boxes that reduces the amount of reactive power generated by a computer.
  • phase - In electronic signaling, a phase is the position of a wave at a point in time (instant) on a waveform cycle.
  • phase-locked loop (PLL) - A phase-locked loop (PLL) is an electronic circuit with a voltage or voltage-driven oscillator that constantly adjusts to match the frequency of an input signal.
SearchNetworking
  • throughput

    Throughput is a measure of how many units of information a system can process in a given amount of time.

  • traffic shaping

    Traffic shaping, also known as packet shaping, is a congestion management method that regulates network data transfer by delaying...

  • open networking

    Open networking describes a network that uses open standards and commodity hardware.

SearchSecurity
  • buffer underflow

    A buffer underflow, also known as a buffer underrun or a buffer underwrite, is when the buffer -- the temporary holding space ...

  • single sign-on (SSO)

    Single sign-on (SSO) is a session and user authentication service that permits a user to use one set of login credentials -- for ...

  • pen testing (penetration testing)

    A penetration test, also called a pen test or ethical hacking, is a cybersecurity technique that organizations use to identify, ...

SearchCIO
  • benchmark

    A benchmark is a standard or point of reference people can use to measure something else.

  • spatial computing

    Spatial computing broadly characterizes the processes and tools used to capture, process and interact with 3D data.

  • organizational goals

    Organizational goals are strategic objectives that a company's management establishes to outline expected outcomes and guide ...

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  • talent acquisition

    Talent acquisition is the strategic process employers use to analyze their long-term talent needs in the context of business ...

  • employee retention

    Employee retention is the organizational goal of keeping productive and talented workers and reducing turnover by fostering a ...

  • hybrid work model

    A hybrid work model is a workforce structure that includes employees who work remotely and those who work on site, in a company's...

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