Browse Definitions :

Personal computing

Terms related to personal computers, including definitions about computers sold as consumer products and words and phrases about laptops, tablets and smartphones.

WHA - ZOO

  • What is a Server? - A server is a computer program or device that provides a service to another computer program and its user, also known as the client.
  • What is PaaS? Platform as a service definition and guide - Platform as a service (PaaS) is a cloud computing model where a third-party provider delivers hardware and software tools to users over the internet.
  • What is user-generated content and why is it important? - User-generated content (UGC) is published information that an unpaid contributor provides to a website.
  • WhatsApp - WhatsApp is a free cross-platform messaging service.
  • white space device (WSD) - A white space device is an FCC-certified wireless device that can be used without an exclusive broadcast license in the RF spectrum below 700 MHz: underutilized, unlicensed portions of the spectrum called white space.
  • whitelist (allowlist) - A whitelist (allowlist) is a cybersecurity strategy that approves a list of email addresses, IP addresses, domain names or applications, while denying all others.
  • wiki - A wiki (sometimes spelled "Wiki") is a server program that allows users to collaborate in forming the content of a Web site.
  • Windows 7 - Windows 7 is the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS) released commercially in October 2009 as the successor to Windows Vista.
  • Winsock - Winsock is a programming interface and the supporting program that handles input/output requests for Internet applications in a Windows operating system.
  • Wintel - Wintel is a computer trade industry term for personal computers based on the Intel microprocessor and one of the Windows operating system from Microsoft.
  • Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) - Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) is a specification for a set of communication protocols to standardize the way that wireless devices, such as cellular telephones and radio transceivers, can be used for internet access, including email, the web, newsgroups and instant messaging.
  • Wolfram Alpha - Wolfram Alpha is a computational search engine (sometimes referred to as an "answer engine").
  • workaround - A workaround is a method, sometimes used temporarily, for achieving a task or goal when the usual or planned method isn't working.
  • workstation - A workstation is a computer intended for individual use that is faster and more capable than a personal computer.
  • World Wide Web (WWW) - The World Wide Web -- also known as the web, WWW or W3 -- refers to all the public websites or pages that users can access on their local computers and other devices through the internet.
  • WXGA - WXGA, which stands for wide XGA, is a term used in product specifications to describe a display screen that is appropriate for business but is also suitable for watching DVDs.
  • WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) - WYSIWYG (pronounced wiz-ee-wig) is a type of editing software that allows users to see and edit content in a form that appears as it would when displayed on an interface, webpage, slide presentation or printed document.
  • X (compact disc access time) - In compact disc (CD) and digital versatile disc (DVD) technology, X is a base multiplier that expresses the speed with which data could be read (the read access time) from the compact disc in its original version, which was 150 kilobytes (KB) per second.
  • x and y coordinates - X and y coordinates are, respectively, the horizontal and vertical addresses of a point in any two-dimensional (2D) space, such as a sheet of paper or a computer display screen.
  • X.400 - X.400 is the messaging (notably e-mail) standard specified by the ITU-TS (International Telecommunications Union - Telecommunication Standard Sector).
  • XACML (Extensible Access Control Markup Language) - XACML (Extensible Access Control Markup Language) is an attribute-based access control policy language (ABAC) or XML-based language, designed to express security policies and access requests to information.
  • xerography (electrophotography) - Xerography, also known as electrophotography, is a printing and photocopying technique that works on the basis of electrostatic charges.
  • Xerox - Xerox is a provider of document-related technology and services.
  • XML (Extensible Markup Language) - XML (Extensible Markup Language) is used to describe data.
  • XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) - XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language), formerly called Extensible Style Language, is a language for creating a style sheet that describes how data sent over the Web using the Extensible Markup Language (XML) is to be presented to the user.
  • yak shaving - Yak shaving is programming lingo for the seemingly endless series of small tasks that have to be completed before the next step in a project can move forward.
  • z coordinate - A z coordinate is the third-dimensional coordinate in a volume pixel, or voxel.
  • zero rating - Zero rating is the practice of not charging customers for data use on specific websites and services by Internet service providers (ISPs) and mobile service providers (MSPs).
  • Zero-TV - Zero-TV is Nielsen's category for homes that neither subscribe to cable or satellite television services nor use an antenna to boost signals for over the air (OTA) broadcasts.
  • Zimbra Collaboration Server - Zimbra is an open source server and client technology for enterprise messaging and collaboration.
  • zoetrope - The zoetrope (pronounced ZOH-uh-trohp), invented in 1834 by William George Horner, was an early form of motion picture projector that consisted of a drum containing a set of still images, that was turned in a circular fashion in order to create the illusion of motion.
  • Zoom fatigue (virtual meeting fatigue) - Zoom fatigue, also known as virtual meeting fatigue, is the feeling of exhaustion that often occurs after attending a series of virtual video meetings.
  • zoopraxiscope - The zoopraxiscope (pronounced ZOH-uh-PRACKS-uh-scohp), invented by British photographer Eadweard Muybridge and first shown in 1879, was a primitive version of later motion picture devices which worked by showing a sequence of still photographs in rapid succession.
SearchNetworking
  • network security

    Network security encompasses all the steps taken to protect the integrity of a computer network and the data within it.

  • cloud-native network function (CNF)

    A cloud-native network function (CNF) is a service that performs network duties in software, as opposed to purpose-built hardware.

  • Wi-Fi 6E

    Wi-Fi 6E is one variant of the 802.11ax standard.

SearchSecurity
  • incident response

    Incident response is an organized approach to addressing and managing the aftermath of a security breach or cyberattack, also ...

  • MICR (magnetic ink character recognition)

    MICR (magnetic ink character recognition) is a technology invented in the 1950s that's used to verify the legitimacy or ...

  • What is cybersecurity?

    Cybersecurity is the protection of internet-connected systems such as hardware, software and data from cyberthreats.

SearchCIO
  • privacy compliance

    Privacy compliance is a company's accordance with established personal information protection guidelines, specifications or ...

  • contingent workforce

    A contingent workforce is a labor pool whose members are hired by an organization on an on-demand basis.

  • product development (new product development -- NPD)

    Product development, also called new product management, is a series of steps that includes the conceptualization, design, ...

SearchHRSoftware
  • talent acquisition

    Talent acquisition is the strategic process employers use to analyze their long-term talent needs in the context of business ...

  • employee retention

    Employee retention is the organizational goal of keeping productive and talented workers and reducing turnover by fostering a ...

  • hybrid work model

    A hybrid work model is a workforce structure that includes employees who work remotely and those who work on site, in a company's...

SearchCustomerExperience
  • hockey stick growth

    Hockey stick growth is a growth pattern in a line chart that shows a sudden and extremely rapid growth after a long period of ...

  • Salesforce Trailhead

    Salesforce Trailhead is a series of online tutorials that coach beginner and intermediate developers who need to learn how to ...

  • Salesforce

    Salesforce, Inc. is a cloud computing and social enterprise software-as-a-service (SaaS) provider based in San Francisco.

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