Browse Definitions :

Personal computing

Terms related to personal computers, including definitions about computers sold as consumer products and words and phrases about laptops, tablets and smartphones.

FTP - IDE

  • FTP (File Transfer Protocol) - FTP (File Transfer Protocol) is a network protocol for transmitting files between computers over TCP/IP connections.
  • FUBAR - FUBAR is an acronym that originated in the military to stand for the words "f***ed up beyond all repair.
  • full HDTV (ultra-HD, true HDTV, 1080p) - Full HDTV, also referred to as ultra-HD, true HDTV, and 1080p, is a television (TV) display technology specification that surpasses the quality over the original 720p high-definition television (HDTV) technology specification, providing an image resolution of 1920 by 1080 pixels.
  • full-disk encryption (FDE) - What is full-disk encryption (FDE)?Full-disk encryption (FDE) is encryption at the hardware level.
  • fuzzy search - A fuzzy search is a technique that uses search algorithms to find strings that match patterns approximately.
  • gaming - Gaming is the running of specialized applications known as electronic games, especially on machines designed for such programs and, in a more recent trend, using personal computers on the Internet in which case the activity is known as online gaming.
  • gaming disorder - Gaming disorder is the obsessive and compulsive overuse of internet games and video games as an escape from life, resulting in the prioritization of gaming over daily activities and interests and the continuation of gaming despite the negative consequences that may occur.
  • geek - In computers and the Internet, a geek is a person who is inordinately dedicated to and involved with technology.
  • general-purpose computer - A general-purpose computer is one that, given the appropriate application and required time, should be able to perform most common computing tasks.
  • Generation Z - Generation Z is the demographic cohort following Generation Y -- which is more popularly known as the Millennial Generation.
  • geo-marketing - Geo-marketing is a tool that uses geographic, or location-based, information to help companies put together marketing strategies and campaigns.
  • geospatial analysis - Geospatial analysis is the gathering, display, and manipulation of imagery, GPS, satellite photography and historical data, described explicitly in terms of geographic coordinates or implicitly, in terms of a street address, postal code, or forest stand identifier as they are applied to geographic models.
  • geotagging - Geotagging is the addition of geographical information, usually in the form of latitude and longitude coordinates, to Web sites, images, videos, smartphone transmissions, and various other data types and sources.
  • giant - In networks, a giant is a packet, frame, cell, or other transmission unit that is too large.
  • GIF89a (Graphics Interchange Format Version 89a) - A GIF89a graphics file is an image formatted according to Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) Version 89a (July, 1989).
  • gift economy - A gift economy is one in which services or goods are given without an agreement as to a suitable payment or trade to be made in return.
  • GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) - GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a freely available open source application for creating and manipulating graphic images that runs on Linux, other Unix-based operating systems, and also on Windows and Mac OS X.
  • glyph - In information technology, a glyph (pronounced GLIHF ; from a Greek word meaning carving) is a graphic symbol that provides the appearance or form for a character.
  • Gmail - Gmail (pronounced Gee-mail) is a free Web-based e-mail service that provides users with a gigabyte of storage for messages and provides the ability to search for specific messages.
  • GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching or Multiprotocol Lambda Switching) - GMPLS (Generalized Multiprotocol Label Switching) is a networking technology that enables fast and reliable network switching of data flows on any type of network infrastructure.
  • GNU GRUB - GNU GRUB (or just GRUB) is a boot loader package that supports multiple operating systems on a computer.
  • Godwin's law - Godwin's law, also known as Godwin's rule of Hitler analogies, is a statement maintaining that if any online discussion continues long enough, someone will almost certainly compare someone else to Hitler.
  • Google Chrome OS - Google Chrome OS is an open source lightweight operating system (OS).
  • Google Docs - Google Docs, first released in 2006, is a free web-based word processor in which documents can be created, edited and stored as part of the Google Docs Editors suite of free web applications.
  • Google Glass - Google Glass is a wearable, voice- and motion-controlled Android device that resembles a pair of eyeglasses and displays information directly in the user's field of vision.
  • Google Maps - Google Maps is a web-based service that provides detailed information about geographical regions and sites worldwide.
  • Google Street View - Google Street View is a feature of Google Maps that enables users to view and navigate through 360 degree horizontal and 290 degree vertical panoramic street level images of various cities around the world.
  • Google Trends - Google Trends is a free service provided by Google that displays how often specific keywords, subjects and phrases have been searched for on Google over a period of time.
  • Google+ (Google Plus) - Google+ (pronounced Google plus) is Google's social networking platform.
  • Googling - Googling is using the popular search engine Google.
  • Gopher - From about 1992 through 1996, Gopher was an Internet application in which hierarchically-organized text files could be brought from servers all over the world to a viewer on your computer.
  • gov - gov is one of the top-level domain names that can be used when choosing a domain name.
  • GPGPU (general purpose graphics processing unit) - A general-purpose GPU (GPGPU) is a graphics processing unit (GPU) that performs non-specialized calculations that would typically be conducted by the CPU (central processing unit).
  • GPS coordinates - GPS coordinates are a unique identifier of a precise geographic location on the earth, usually expressed in alphanumeric characters.
  • GPS navigation system - A GPS navigation system is a GPS receiver and audio/video (AV) components designed for a specific purpose such as a car-based or hand-held device or a smartphone app.
  • GPU supercomputer - A GPU supercomputer is a networked group of computers with multiple graphics processing units working as general-purpose GPUs (GPGPUs) in tandem on a single task.
  • graceful shutdown and hard shutdown - Graceful shutdown and hard shutdown are two opposing methods of turning off a computer.
  • granularity - Granularity is the relative size, scale, level of detail, or depth of penetration that characterizes an object or activity.
  • Graph Search - Graph Search is a search engine that is integrated with Facebook’s social graphs.
  • graphene transistor - A graphene transistor is a nanoscale device based on graphene, a component of graphite with electronic properties far superior to those of silicon.
  • grawlix - A grawlix is a sequence of typographical symbols used to represent a non-specific, profane word or phrase.
  • gray market - The gray market (sometimes spelled as "grey market") is the collective system of unauthorized sales channels for products.
  • grayscale - Grayscale is a range of shades of gray without apparent color.
  • green cloud - Green cloud is a buzzword that refers to the potential environmental benefits that IT services delivered over the internet can offer society.
  • green screen (blue screen) - Green screen (also blue screen) is the use of a single color as a backdrop in filming to make it simpler and easier to add backgrounds, characters or other images.
  • greenhouse effect - The Greenhouse effect is the warming effect of the sun on greenhouse gases like CO2 that act to trap this heat in our atmosphere.
  • greenhouse gas - A greenhouse gas is a gas that absorbs infrared (IR) radiation and radiates heat in all directions.
  • greylist (or graylist) - A greylist (also spelled graylist) is a list of e-mail addresses or domain names that a spam filter uses to identify suspected spam.
  • grid computing - Grid computing is a system for connecting a large number of computer nodes into a distributed architecture that delivers the compute resources necessary to solve complex problems.
  • grok - To grok (pronounced GRAHK) something is to understand something so well that it is fully absorbed into oneself.
  • Group Policy - Group Policy is a hierarchical infrastructure that allows a network administrator in charge of Microsoft's Active Directory to implement specific configurations for users and computers.
  • Group Policy Object (GPO) - Microsoft’s Group Policy Object (GPO) is a collection of Group Policy settings that defines what a system will look like and how it will behave for a defined group of users.
  • Groupon - Groupon is a marketing service that offers its subscribers daily discount coupons by email, Facebook and Twitter feeds.
  • GRUB (GRand Unified Bootloader) - GRUB (GRand Unified Bootloader) is a boot loader package developed to support multiple operating systems and allow the user to select among them during boot-up.
  • hacktivism - Hacktivism is the act of misusing a computer system or network for a socially or politically motivated reason.
  • handheld - A handheld computer is a computer that can conveniently be stored in a pocket (of sufficient size) and used while you're holding it.
  • hangup (or hang) - A hangup, also called a hang, is a condition that sometimes occurs when computer programs conflict or do not run properly.
  • haptics - Haptics (pronounced HAP-tiks) is the science of applying touch (tactile) sensation and control to interaction with computer applications.
  • hard bounce - A hard bounce is an e-mail message that has been returned to the sender because the recipient's address is invalid.
  • hard copy (printout) - A hard copy (or "hardcopy") is a printed copy of information from a computer.
  • hard reset (factory reset; master reset) - A hard reset, also known as a factory reset or master reset, is the restoration of a device, such as a smartphone or tablet, to its state when it left the factory.
  • hard-drive encryption - Hard-drive encryption is a technology that encrypts the data stored on a hard drive using sophisticated mathematical functions.
  • HDMI - HDMI (High Definition Multimedia Interface) is a specification that combines video and audio into a single digital interface for use with digital versatile disc (DVD) players, digital television (DTV) players, set-top boxes, and other audiovisual devices.
  • HDTV (high definition television) - HDTV (high definition television) is a television display technology that provides picture quality similar to 35 mm.
  • head tracking - Head tracking is a software application that monitors a user’s head position and orientation.
  • heads-up display (HUD) - A heads-up display (HUD) is a transparent or miniaturized display technology that does not require users to shift their gaze from where they are naturally looking.
  • heat bed - A heat bed is an additional module for a 3D printer that makes the cooling process of 3D printed materials more controlled, for better results.
  • hibernation - Hibernation is a mode in which a computer is turned off but saves its state to resume when it is turned on again.
  • hierarchical menu - A hierarchical menu is a multi-level arrangement of options, organized to allow users to find information, tools, or functions more easily than they could in an unstructured presentation.
  • HiPPO (highest paid person's opinion, highest paid person in the office) - HiPPOs (highest paid person's opinions) is a term used to describe an organization's reliance on executive instinct rather than data in the decision-making process.
  • holodeck - The holodeck is an immersive virtual reality environment that was featured on Star Trek, a popular science fiction television and film series of the late 20th century.
  • hologram - A hologram (pronounced HOL-o-gram) is a three-dimensional image, created with photographic projection.
  • holographic display - A holographic display is a display that uses coherent light, such as that created by laser, to create a three-dimensional (3D) image in space.
  • holographic print - A holographic print is a rendition of a hologram on a flat surface, producing 3-D (three-dimensional) effects when viewed.
  • holographic processing unit (HPU) - Holographic processing unit (HPU) is what Microsoft has named the coprocessor in its HoloLens virtual reality (VR) headset.
  • home page - For a Web user, the home page is the first Web page that is displayed after starting a Web browser like Netscape's Navigator or Microsoft's Internet Explorer.
  • home server - A home server is a computer that functions as a server in a client-server home network.
  • honey monkey - A honey monkey is a virtual computer system that is programmed to lure, detect, identify and neutralize malicious activity on the Internet.
  • HORNET (high-speed onion routing network) - HORNET is an anonymized and accelerated onion routing network; the name is an acronym for high speed onion routing network.
  • host (in computing) - A host (also known as "network host") is a computer or other device that communicates with other hosts on a network.
  • Host OS (host operating system) - A host OS is the software installed on a computer that interacts with the underlying hardware in a computer using virtualization technology.
  • hosting (Web site hosting, Web hosting, and Webhosting) - Hosting (also known as Web site hosting, Web hosting, and Webhosting) is the business of housing, serving, and maintaining files for one or more Web sites.
  • hot key - A hot key is a key or a combination of keys on a computer keyboard that, when pressed at one time, performs a task (such as starting an application) more quickly than by using a mouse or other input device.
  • hotfix - A hotfix is code (sometimes called a patch) that fixes a bug in a product.
  • hotword - Hotword is an audio listening module included with Google Chrome and Chromium, the open source version of the browser.
  • HTML 4.0 - HTML 4.0 was the final version of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) before the Extensible Markup Language (XHTML) and remains the set of markup on which most large Web sites today are based.
  • HTML validator - An HTML validator is a quality assurance program used to check Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) markup elements for syntax errors.
  • HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) - HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is the set of rules for transferring files -- such as text, images, sound, video and other multimedia files -- over the web.
  • HTTP 1.1 - HTTP 1.1 is the latest version of Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), the World Wide Web application protocol that runs on top of the Internet's TCP/IP suite of protocols.
  • hub transport server (HT server) - Hub transport server is an Exchange Server role that handles all mail flow within an Exchange organization.
  • Human Interface Device protocol - Human Interface Device protocol (HID protocol) is a USB protocol for a broad category of user input devices.
  • Hyper-Threading - Hyper-Threading is a technology used by some Intel microprocessors that allows a single microprocessor to act like two separate processors to the operating system and the application programs that use it.
  • hypermedia - Hypermedia, a term derived from hypertext, extends the notion of the hypertext link to include links among any set of multimedia objects, including sound, motion video, and virtual reality.
  • HyperTerminal - HyperTerminal is a communications and terminal emulation program that came with the Windows 98 and Windows XP operating systems.
  • hypertext - Hypertext is the organization of information units into connected associations that a user can choose to make.
  • Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon (HTTPD) - On the Web, each server has an HTTPD or Hypertext Transfer Protocol daemon that waits in attendance for requests to come in from the rest of the Web.
  • iBeacon - iBeacon is a small-scale network device that uses Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) and acts as a transmitter to detect and track smartphones.
  • iCloud - Apple's free iCloud service stores subscribers' photos, videos, documents, apps and more and updates everything across users' synced devices.
  • icon - In today's age of technological advancement, most people recognize the word 'icon' as referring to a small selectable or nonselectable image representing or leading to something else in a computer's graphical user interface (GUI) or on the web.
  • IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) - IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) is an electronic interface standard that defines the connection between a bus on a computer's motherboard and the computer's disk storage devices.
SearchNetworking
  • network security

    Network security encompasses all the steps taken to protect the integrity of a computer network and the data within it.

  • cloud-native network function (CNF)

    A cloud-native network function (CNF) is a service that performs network duties in software, as opposed to purpose-built hardware.

  • microsegmentation

    Microsegmentation is a security technique that splits a network into definable zones and uses policies to dictate how data and ...

SearchSecurity
  • incident response

    Incident response is an organized approach to addressing and managing the aftermath of a security breach or cyberattack, also ...

  • MICR (magnetic ink character recognition)

    MICR (magnetic ink character recognition) is a technology invented in the 1950s that's used to verify the legitimacy or ...

  • What is cybersecurity?

    Cybersecurity is the protection of internet-connected systems such as hardware, software and data from cyberthreats.

SearchCIO
  • privacy compliance

    Privacy compliance is a company's accordance with established personal information protection guidelines, specifications or ...

  • contingent workforce

    A contingent workforce is a labor pool whose members are hired by an organization on an on-demand basis.

  • product development (new product development -- NPD)

    Product development, also called new product management, is a series of steps that includes the conceptualization, design, ...

SearchHRSoftware
  • talent acquisition

    Talent acquisition is the strategic process employers use to analyze their long-term talent needs in the context of business ...

  • employee retention

    Employee retention is the organizational goal of keeping productive and talented workers and reducing turnover by fostering a ...

  • hybrid work model

    A hybrid work model is a workforce structure that includes employees who work remotely and those who work on site, in a company's...

SearchCustomerExperience
  • hockey stick growth

    Hockey stick growth is a growth pattern in a line chart that shows a sudden and extremely rapid growth after a long period of ...

  • Salesforce Trailhead

    Salesforce Trailhead is a series of online tutorials that coach beginner and intermediate developers who need to learn how to ...

  • Salesforce

    Salesforce, Inc. is a cloud computing and social enterprise software-as-a-service (SaaS) provider based in San Francisco.

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