Browse Definitions :
Definition

domain-driven design (DDD)

Domain-driven design (DDD) is a software development philosophy centered around the domain, or sphere of knowledge, of those that use it. The approach enables the development of software that is focused on the complex requirements of those that need it and doesn’t waste effort on anything unneeded. The clients of domain-driven design are often enterprise-level businesses.

To design from a domain-driven perspective, the business's area of expertise or domain must be defined. There are supporting and core domains. The core domain of a business is unique and central to its operation, therefore receiving the majority of attention, time and resources in the development process. The supporting domains are more general such as money, service or time. These domains are then modelled out in language and then in corresponding code. If a domain can’t be easily defined in language, it is not ready to be coded. If a change is made in a domain of business, a corresponding change in the code would generally be required.

The book Domain Driven Design by Eric Evans introduced the philosophy. Domain-driven design draws on object-oriented analysis and design. The approach eases communication about the project at hand and limits focus on needs central to the domain. At the same time, domain-driven design requires extensive knowledge of a domain and is poorly suited to highly technical projects.

This was last updated in January 2018

Continue Reading About domain-driven design (DDD)

Networking
  • firewall as a service (FWaaS)

    Firewall as a service (FWaaS), also known as a cloud firewall, is a service that provides cloud-based network traffic analysis ...

  • private 5G

    Private 5G is a wireless network technology that delivers 5G cellular connectivity for private network use cases.

  • NFVi (network functions virtualization infrastructure)

    NFVi (network functions virtualization infrastructure) encompasses all of the networking hardware and software needed to support ...

Security
  • phishing

    Phishing is a fraudulent practice in which an attacker masquerades as a reputable entity or person in an email or other form of ...

  • computer forensics (cyber forensics)

    Computer forensics is the application of investigation and analysis techniques to gather and preserve evidence from a particular ...

  • cybersecurity

    Cybersecurity is the practice of protecting internet-connected systems such as hardware, software and data from cyberthreats.

CIO
HRSoftware
  • OKRs (Objectives and Key Results)

    OKRs (Objectives and Key Results) encourage companies to set, communicate and monitor organizational goals and results in an ...

  • cognitive diversity

    Cognitive diversity is the inclusion of people who have different styles of problem-solving and can offer unique perspectives ...

  • reference checking software

    Reference checking software is programming that automates the process of contacting and questioning the references of job ...

Customer Experience
  • martech (marketing technology)

    Martech (marketing technology) refers to the integration of software tools, platforms, and applications designed to streamline ...

  • transactional marketing

    Transactional marketing is a business strategy that focuses on single, point-of-sale transactions.

  • customer profiling

    Customer profiling is the detailed and systematic process of constructing a clear portrait of a company's ideal customer by ...

Close