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Personal computing

Terms related to personal computers, including definitions about computers sold as consumer products and words and phrases about laptops, tablets and smartphones.

WAV - ZOO

  • Wave file - A Wave file is an audio file format, created by Microsoft, that has become a standard PC audio file format for everything from system and game sounds to CD-quality audio.
  • wearable computer - A wearable computer is any small technological device capable of storing and processing data that can be worn on the body.
  • wearable technology - Wearable technology is any kind of electronic device designed to be worn on the user's body.
  • Web 2.0 - Web 2.0 are websites and applications that make use of user-generated content for end-users.
  • web offset printing - Web offset is a form of offset printing in which a continuous roll of paper is fed through the printing press.
  • Web presence - A Web presence (or Web site) is a collection of Web files on a particular subject that includes a beginning file called a home page.
  • web server - A web server is software and hardware that uses HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) and other protocols to respond to client requests made over the World Wide Web.
  • Web site - This definition is also listed under presence, site and Website.
  • Web texting - Web texting is two-way text messaging from the Web to a handheld mobile device, usually a cellular phone.
  • Web-Based Enterprise Management (WBEM) - Web-Based Enterprise Management (WBEM) is a set of industry standards that an enterprise can use to manage its information operations in the distributed computing environment of the Internet.
  • WebGL - WebGL is a graphics application programming interface (API) created for use in web applications.
  • webinar - A webinar is an educational, informative or instructional presentation that is made available online, usually as video or audio with slides.
  • weblog - A weblog, sometimes written as web log or Weblog, is a Web site that consists of a series of entries arranged in reverse chronological order, often updated on frequently with new information about particular topics.
  • webOS - WebOS is an LG-owned, Linux based, smart TV operating system that is set up to allow control and access of LG Smart TV’s more advanced features and connected devices through a graphical user interface (GUI).
  • Weebly - Weebly is a freemium website creation and Web-hosting service.
  • weighted fair queueing (WFQ) - Weighted fair queueing (WFQ) is a method of automatically smoothing out the flow of data in packet-switched communication networks by sorting packets to minimize the average latency and prevent exaggerated discrepancies between the transmission efficiency afforded to narrowband versus broadband signals.
  • What is a Server? - A server is a computer program or device that provides a service to another computer program and its user, also known as the client.
  • What is PaaS? Platform as a service definition and guide - Platform as a service (PaaS) is a cloud computing model where a third-party provider delivers hardware and software tools to users over the internet.
  • WhatsApp - WhatsApp Messenger is a cross-platform instant messaging application that allows iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, Windows Phone and Nokia smartphone users to exchange text, image, video and audio messages for free.
  • whitelist (allowlist) - A whitelist (allowlist) is a cybersecurity strategy that approves a list of email addresses, IP addresses, domain names or applications, while denying all others.
  • wiki - A wiki (sometimes spelled "Wiki") is a server program that allows users to collaborate in forming the content of a Web site.
  • Windows 1.0 - Windows 1.0 was the first of Microsoft’s GUI-based operating systems, released in 1985.
  • Windows 3.0 - Windows 3.0 was the 3rd version of Microsoft’s GUI-based operating system, released in 1990.
  • Windows 3.1 - Windows 3.1 was the 4th version of Microsoft’s GUI-based operating system, released in 1993.
  • Windows 7 - Windows 7 is the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS) released commercially in October 2009 as the successor to Windows Vista.
  • Windows 95 - Windows 95 was the 5th version of Microsoft’s GUI operating system, released in 1995.
  • Windows Mixed Reality - Windows Mixed Reality is a Microsoft platform for virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and mixed reality (MR).
  • Windows XP Mode - Windows XP Mode is a feature of the Windows 7 operating system that allows it to run applications that are only compatible with Windows XP.
  • Winsock - Winsock is a programming interface and the supporting program that handles input/output requests for Internet applications in a Windows operating system.
  • Wintel - Wintel is a computer trade industry term for personal computers based on the Intel microprocessor and one of the Windows operating system from Microsoft.
  • Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) - Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) is a specification for a set of communication protocols to standardize the way that wireless devices, such as cellular telephones and radio transceivers, can be used for internet access, including email, the web, newsgroups and instant messaging.
  • Wolfram Alpha - Wolfram Alpha is a computational search engine (sometimes referred to as an "answer engine").
  • workaround - A workaround is a method, sometimes used temporarily, for achieving a task or goal when the usual or planned method isn't working.
  • workstation - A workstation is a computer intended for individual use that is faster and more capable than a personal computer.
  • World Wide Web (WWW) - The World Wide Web -- also known as the web, WWW or W3 -- refers to all the public websites or pages that users can access on their local computers and other devices through the internet.
  • WXGA - WXGA, which stands for wide XGA, is a term used in product specifications to describe a display screen that is appropriate for business but is also suitable for watching DVDs.
  • WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) - A WYSIWYG (pronounced "wiz-ee-wig") editor or program is one that allows a developer to see what the end result will look like while the interface or document is being created.
  • X (compact disc access time) - In compact disc (CD) and digital versatile disc (DVD) technology, X is a base multiplier that expresses the speed with which data could be read (the read access time) from the compact disc in its original version, which was 150 kilobytes (KB) per second.
  • x and y coordinates - x, y coordinates are respectively the horizontal and vertical addresses of any pixel or addressable point on a computer display screen.
  • X.400 - X.400 is the messaging (notably e-mail) standard specified by the ITU-TS (International Telecommunications Union - Telecommunication Standard Sector).
  • XACML (Extensible Access Control Markup Language) - XACML (Extensible Access Control Markup Language) is an attribute-based access control policy language (ABAC) or XML-based language, designed to express security policies and access requests to information.
  • xerography (electrophotography) - Xerography, also known as electrophotography, is a printing and photocopying technique that works on the basis of electrostatic charges.
  • Xerox - Xerox is a provider of document-related technology and services.
  • XML (Extensible Markup Language) - XML (Extensible Markup Language) is used to describe data.
  • XQuery - XQuery is a specification for a query language that allows a user or programmer to extract information from an Extensible Markup Language (XML) file or any collection of data that can be XML-like.
  • XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) - XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language), formerly called Extensible Style Language, is a language for creating a style sheet that describes how data sent over the Web using the Extensible Markup Language (XML) is to be presented to the user.
  • yak shaving - Yak shaving is programming lingo for the seemingly endless series of small tasks that have to be completed before the next step in a project can move forward.
  • z coordinate - A z coordinate is the third-dimensional coordinate in a volume pixel, or voxel.
  • zero rating - Zero rating is the practice of not charging customers for data use on specific websites and services by Internet service providers (ISPs) and mobile service providers (MSPs).
  • Zero-TV - Zero-TV is Nielsen's category for homes that neither subscribe to cable or satellite television services nor use an antenna to boost signals for over the air (OTA) broadcasts.
  • Zimbra Collaboration Server - Zimbra is an open source server and client technology for enterprise messaging and collaboration.
  • zoetrope - The zoetrope (pronounced ZOH-uh-trohp), invented in 1834 by William George Horner, was an early form of motion picture projector that consisted of a drum containing a set of still images, that was turned in a circular fashion in order to create the illusion of motion.
  • Zoom fatigue (virtual meeting fatigue) - Zoom fatigue, also known as virtual meeting fatigue, is the feeling of exhaustion that often occurs after attending a series of virtual video meetings.
  • zoopraxiscope - The zoopraxiscope (pronounced ZOH-uh-PRACKS-uh-scohp), invented by British photographer Eadweard Muybridge and first shown in 1879, was a primitive version of later motion picture devices which worked by showing a sequence of still photographs in rapid succession.
SearchNetworking
  • virtual network functions (VNFs)

    Virtual network functions (VNFs) are virtualized tasks formerly carried out by proprietary, dedicated hardware.

  • network functions virtualization (NFV)

    Network functions virtualization (NFV) is a network architecture model designed to virtualize network services that have ...

  • overlay network

    An overlay network is a virtual or logical network that is created on top of an existing physical network.

SearchSecurity
  • X.509 certificate

    An X.509 certificate is a digital certificate that uses the widely accepted international X.509 public key infrastructure (PKI) ...

  • directory traversal

    Directory traversal is a type of HTTP exploit in which a hacker uses the software on a web server to access data in a directory ...

  • malware

    Malware, or malicious software, is any program or file that is intentionally harmful to a computer, network or server.

SearchCIO
  • data latency

    Data latency is the time it takes for data packets to be stored or retrieved. In business intelligence (BI), data latency is how ...

  • chief data officer (CDO)

    A chief data officer (CDO) in many organizations is a C-level executive whose position has evolved into a range of strategic data...

  • information technology (IT) director

    An information technology (IT) director is the person in charge of technology within an organization. IT directors manage ...

SearchHRSoftware
SearchCustomerExperience
  • implementation

    Implementation is the execution or practice of a plan, a method or any design, idea, model, specification, standard or policy for...

  • first call resolution (FCR)

    First call resolution (FCR) is when customer service agents properly address a customer's needs the first time they call.

  • customer intelligence (CI)

    Customer intelligence (CI) is the process of collecting and analyzing detailed customer data from internal and external sources ...

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