Browse Definitions :

High-speed networks

Terms related to high-speed communication networks, including network and end-system architecture definitions and words and phrases about high-bandwidth and low-latency communication.

EAV - PLA

  • eavesdropping - Eavesdropping is the unauthorized real-time interception of a private communication, such as a phone call, instant message, videoconference or fax transmission.
  • Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) - Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) is a network protocol that enables routers to exchange information more efficiently than earlier network protocols, such as Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) or Border Gateway Protocol (BGP).
  • enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) - Enterprise-mobile integration (EMI) is a form of fixed-mobile convergence (FMC) that provides integration between communications carriers and enterprise networks.
  • erlang - The Erlang programming language is not the same thing as the erlang, a unit of traffic density.
  • Erlang C - Erlang C is a traffic modeling formula, primarily used in call center scheduling to calculate delays and to predict waiting times for callers.
  • Ethernet - Ethernet is the traditional technology for connecting devices in a wired local area network (LAN) or wide area network (WAN).
  • EWSD (Electronic Worldwide Switch Digital) - EWSD (Electronic Worldwide Switch Digital, or, in German, Elektronisches WaehlSystem [Digital]) is a widely-installed telephonic switch system developed by Siemens.
  • fabric - In information technology, fabric is a synonym for the words framework or platform.
  • fax - A fax (short for facsimile and sometimes called telecopying) is the telephonic transmission of scanned-in printed material (text or images), usually to a telephone number associated with a printer or other output device.
  • FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface) - FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface) is a network standard that uses fiber optic connections in a local area network (LAN) that can extend in range up to 200 kilometers (124 miles).
  • feed line - In a wireless communications or broadcasting antenna system, the feed line connects the antenna to the receiver, transmitter, or transceiver.
  • fiber optics (optical fiber) - Fiber optics, or optical fiber, refers to the technology that transmits information as light pulses along a glass or plastic fiber.
  • fiber to the home (FTTH) - Fiber to the home (FTTH), also called fiber to the premises (FTTP), is the installation and use of optical fiber from a central point directly to individual buildings such as residences, apartment buildings and businesses to provide high-speed internet access.
  • fiber to the x (FTTx) - Fiber to the x (FTTx) is a collective term for various optical fiber delivery topologies that are categorized according to where the fiber terminates.
  • Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop (FC-AL) - A Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop (FC-AL) is a high-speed Fibre Channel (FC) topology that can connect up to 126 ports on one controller using a one-way loop or hub design.
  • find me / follow me - Find me and follow me are two call forwarding services that are commonly used in conjunction with each other.
  • flow routing - Flow routing is a network routing technology that takes variations in the flow of data into account to increase routing efficiency.
  • frame - See frames for the use of multiple Web pages on a single display screen.
  • free-space optics (FSO) - Free-space optics (FSO), also called free-space photonics (FSP), refers to the transmission of modulated visible or infrared (IR) beams through the atmosphere to obtain broadband communications.
  • frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) - In frequency-division multiplexing (FDM), multiple signals are combined for transmission on a single communications line or channel, with each signal assigned to a different frequency (subchannel) within the main channel.
  • frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) - Frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) transmission is the repeated switching of the carrier frequency during radio transmission to reduce interference and avoid interception.
  • frequency-shift keying (FSK) - Frequency-shift keying (FSK) is a method of transmitting digital signals using discrete signals.
  • G.711 - G.711 is the default pulse code modulation (PCM) standard for Internet Protocol (IP) private branch exchange (PBX) vendors, as well as for the public switched telephone network (PSTN).
  • G.729 - G.729 is a standard for Internet Protocol (IP) private branch exchange (PBX) vendors, as well as for the public switched telephone network (PSTN).
  • Gbps (billions of bits per second) - Gbps stands for billions of bits per second and is a measure of bandwidth on a digital data transmission medium such as optical fiber.
  • Generic Access Network (GAN) - The Generic Access Network (GAN) is an evolving wireless communications system in which mobile phone sets function seamlessly between local area networks (LANs) and wide-area networks (WANs).
  • geolocation - Geolocation is the detection of the physical location of an Internet connected computing device.
  • geostationary satellite - A geostationary satellite is an earth-orbiting satellite, placed at an altitude of approximately 35,800 kilometers (22,300 miles) directly over the equator, that revolves in the same direction the earth rotates (west to east).
  • gigabit Ethernet phone (gigE phone) - A gigabit Ethernet phone, or gigE phone, is a VoIP telephone that connects to and uses gigabit Ethernet transmission technology to communicate with other phones.
  • gigabit interface converter (GBIC) - A gigabit interface converter (GBIC) is a transceiver that converts electric currents (digital highs and lows) to optical signals, and optical signals to digital electric currents.
  • Global Positioning System (GPS) - The GPS (Global Positioning System) is a 'constellation' of approximately 30 well-spaced satellites that orbit the Earth and make it possible for people with ground receivers to pinpoint their geographic location.
  • GSM (Global System for Mobile communication) - GSM (Global System for Mobile communication) is a digital mobile network that is widely used by mobile phone users in Europe and other parts of the world.
  • H.245 - H.245 is a protocol for the transmission of call management and control signals in packet-based networks using H.
  • half-duplex - Half-duplex data transmission means that data can be transmitted in both directions on a signal carrier, but not at the same time.
  • hop off - Hop off is a term used in telecommunications that refers to a point at which a signal or call leaves a network and moves to another network.
  • hot desking - Hot desking is a work space sharing model in which employees outnumber desks.
  • hundred call second or centum call second (CCS) - The hundred call second -- also known as the centum call second (CCS) -- is a unit of telecommunications traffic density that is the equivalent of one call (including call attempts and holding time) in a specific channel for 100 seconds in an hour.
  • hyperconnectivity - Hyperconnectivity is a state of unified communications (UC) in which the traffic-handling capacity and bandwidth of a network always exceed the demand.
  • IAX (Inter-Asterisk Exchange Protocol) - IAX (Inter-Asterisk Exchange Protocol, pronounced "eeks") is a communications protocol for setting up interactive user sessions.
  • ILEC (incumbent local exchange carrier) - An ILEC (incumbent local exchange carrier) is a telephone company in the U.
  • in-band signaling - In the public switched telephone network, (PSTN), in-band signaling is the exchange of signaling (call control) information on the same channel that the telephone call itself is using.
  • Indefeasible Right of Use (IRU) - In telecommunications, the Indefeasible Right of Use (IRU) is a contractual agreement (temporary ownership) of a portion of the capacity of an international cable.
  • inductive charging - Inductive charging is a wireless charging method used for charging mid-sized items such as cell phones, MP3 players and PDAs.
  • Intelligent Network (IN) - Intelligent Network (IN) is a telephone network architecture originated by Bell Communications Research (Bellcore) in which the service logic for a call is located separately from the switching facilities, allowing services to be added or changed without having to redesign switching equipment.
  • Interactive Voice Response (IVR) - Interactive Voice Response (IVR) is an automated telephony system that interacts with callers, gathers information and routes calls to the appropriate recipients.
  • interconnection - Interconnection is a strategy for ensuring that businesses can privately, securely and directly exchange digital information.
  • interexchange carrier (IXC) - An interexchange carrier (IXC) is a telephone company that provides connections between local exchanges in different geographic areas.
  • international private leased circuit (IPLC) - An international private leased circuit (IPLC) is a point-to-point private line used by an organization to communicate between offices that are dispersed throughout the world.
  • internet metering - Internet metering is a service model in which an internet service provider (ISP) keeps track of bandwidth use and charges users accordingly.
  • IP PBX (private branch exchange) - An IP PBX is a private branch exchange (telephone switching system within an enterprise) that switches calls between VoIP (voice over Internet Protocol or IP) users on local lines while allowing all users to share a certain number of external phone lines.
  • IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) - IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) is a general term for technologies, products and services that use the Internet Protocol's packet-switched connections to support voice calling, voicemail, video calling, video conferencing, faxing and instant messaging.
  • IPTV (Internet Protocol television) - IPTV (Internet Protocol television) is a service that provides television programming and other video content using the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) suite, as opposed to broadcast TV, cable TV or satellite signals.
  • jitter - Jitter is any deviation in, or displacement of, the signal pulses in a high-frequency digital signal.
  • jitter buffer - In voice over IP (VoIP), a jitter buffer is a shared data area where voice packets can be collected, stored, and sent to the voice processor in evenly spaced intervals.
  • Joint Academic Network (JANET) - The Joint Academic Network (JANET) is an internal, high-speed computer network that links the U.
  • jumbo frames - A jumbo frame is an Ethernet frame with a payload greater than the standard maximum transmission unit (MTU) of 1,500 bytes.
  • Kari's law - Kari's law is legislation in the United States that requires multi-line telephone systems (MLTS) to route 9-1-1 emergency service calls through the phone system automatically.
  • kilobit - In data communications, a kilobit is a thousand (103) bits.
  • landline - A landline is a telephone that transmits signals converted from audio data through physical media, such as wire or fibre optic cable, rather than through wireless transmission as is the case with mobile phones.
  • leased line - A leased line is a bidirectional telephone line that has been rented for private voice, data exchange or telecommunication use.
  • least cost routing (LCR) - Least cost routing (LCR) is a process that allows telecommunications providers to select the lowest cost carrier for bandwidth provision for their voice communications.
  • line card - A line card may be a modular electronic telecommunications switching component on a printed circuit board, or a printed brochure or document that contains the names, descriptions and products that are sold by a third party.
  • local access and transport area (LATA) - LATA (local access and transport area) is a term in the U.
  • location awareness - Location awareness is a component of presence technology that delivers information about a device's physical location to another user or application.
  • LTE (Long-Term Evolution) - LTE (Long-Term Evolution) is a standard for 4G wireless technology that offers increased network capacity and speed for cellphones and other cellular devices compared with 3G.
  • LZW compression - LZW compression is the compression of a file into a smaller file using a table-based lookup algorithm invented by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch.
  • managed network services - Managed network services are networking applications, functions and services that enterprises outsource to be remotely operated, monitored and maintained by a managed service provider (MSP).
  • metropolitan area network (MAN) - A metropolitan area network (MAN) is a computer network that is larger than a single building local area network (LAN) but is located in a single geographic area that is smaller than a wide area network (WAN).
  • Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit - Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit is a free utility IT can use to determine whether or not its infrastructure is prepared for a migration to a new operating system, server version or cloud-based deployment.
  • MiFi - MiFi is a portable broadband device that allows multiple end users and mobile devices to share a 3G or 4G mobile broadband Internet connection and create an ad-hoc network.
  • millimeter wave (MM wave) - Millimeter wave (MM wave), also known as millimeter band, is the band of spectrum with wavelengths between 10 millimeters (30 GHz) and 1 millimeter (300 GHz).
  • mobile marketing - Mobile marketing is promotional activity designed for delivery to cell phones, smart phones and other handheld devices, usually as a component of a multi-channel campaign.
  • mobile number portability (MNP) - Mobile number portability (MNP) is a service that allows a cellphone or smartphone customer to change service providers and keep the same phone number.
  • mobile search - Mobile search is the practice of querying a search engine from an Internet-connected handheld device, such as a smart phone.
  • mobile service provider - A mobile service provider (MSP) is a company that offers mobile communication services to users of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs.
  • mobile-to-mobile convergence (MMC) - Mobile-to-mobile convergence (MMC) is a technology that facilitates the interoperability of mobile communications devices without the need for any fixed capabilities or proprietary service provider.
  • modem - A modem modulates outgoing digital signals from a computer or other digital device to analog signals for a conventional copper twisted pair telephone line and demodulates the incoming analog signal and converts it to a digital signal for the digital device.
  • MPLS-TP (MPLS Transport Profile) - The Multiprotocol Label Switching Transport Profile (MPLS-TP) is a protocol extension of MPLS designed to speed up and shape network traffic in operator transport networks.
  • multi-carrier modulation (MCM) - Multi-carrier modulation (MCM) is a method of transmitting data by splitting it into several components, and sending each of these components over separate carrier signals.
  • multiplexing - Multiplexing, or muxing, is a way of sending multiple signals or streams of information over a communications link at the same time in the form of a single, complex signal.
  • near-end crosstalk (NEXT) - Near-end crosstalk (NEXT) is an error condition that can occur when connectors are attached to twisted pair cabling.
  • net neutrality - Net neutrality is the concept of an open, equal internet for everyone, regardless of content consumed or the device, application or platform used.
  • network configuration management (NCM) - Network configuration management is the process of organizing and maintaining information about all of the components in a computer network.
  • network convergence - Network convergence is the efficient coexistence of telephone, video and data communication within a single network.
  • network operations center (NOC) - A network operations center (NOC) is a centralized place from which enterprise information technology (IT) administrators -- either internal or third party -- supervise, monitor and maintain a telecommunications network.
  • network protocol - A network protocol is a set of established rules that dictate how to format, transmit and receive data so that computer network devices -- from servers and routers to endpoints -- can communicate, regardless of the differences in their underlying infrastructures, designs or standards.
  • network switch - A network switch is a hardware device that channels incoming data from multiple input ports to a specific output port that will take it toward its intended destination.
  • noise - Noise is unwanted electrical or electromagnetic energy that degrades the quality of signals and data.
  • Open Handset Alliance (OHA) - The Open Handset Alliance (OHA) is a coalition of more than 30 technology and mobile companies that introduced Android, an open source mobile phone operating system.
  • open networking - Open networking describes a network that uses open standards and commodity hardware.
  • Open Settlement Protocol (OSP) - Open Settlement Protocol (OSP) is a client-server protocol that manages access control, accounting, usage data and inter-domain routing to make it easier for Internet service providers to support IP telephony.
  • operational support system (OSS) - An operational support system (OSS) is a set of programs that help a communications service provider monitor, control, analyze and manage a telephone or computer network.
  • optoisolator (optical coupler or optocoupler) - An optoisolator (also known as an optical coupler, photocoupler, optocoupler) is a semiconductor device that transfers an electrical signal between isolated circuits using light.
  • orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) - Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a method of data transmission where a single information stream is split among several closely spaced narrowband subchannel frequencies instead of a single wideband channel frequency.
  • packet loss concealment (PLC) - Packet loss concealment (PLC) is a technology designed to minimize the practical effect of lost packets in digital communications.
  • paid prioritization - Paid prioritization, in relation to the internet, is the optimization of data transfer rates for certain content providers, websites and web services.
  • passive optical network (PON) - A passive optical network (PON) is a system commonly used by telecommunications network providers that brings fiber optic cabling and signals all or most of the way to the end user.
  • personal area network (PAN) - A personal area network (PAN) is the interconnection of information technology devices within the range of an individual person, typically within a range of 10 meters.
  • personal digital assistant (PDA) - Personal digital assistant is a term for a small, mobile, handheld device that provides computing and information storage and retrieval capabilities for personal or business use, often for keeping schedules, calendars and address book information handy.
  • Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) - Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) refers to the traditional, analog voice transmission phone system implemented over physical copper wires (twisted pair).
SearchNetworking
  • virtual network functions (VNFs)

    Virtual network functions (VNFs) are virtualized tasks formerly carried out by proprietary, dedicated hardware.

  • network functions virtualization (NFV)

    Network functions virtualization (NFV) is a network architecture model designed to virtualize network services that have ...

  • overlay network

    An overlay network is a virtual or logical network that is created on top of an existing physical network.

SearchSecurity
  • X.509 certificate

    An X.509 certificate is a digital certificate that uses the widely accepted international X.509 public key infrastructure (PKI) ...

  • directory traversal

    Directory traversal is a type of HTTP exploit in which a hacker uses the software on a web server to access data in a directory ...

  • malware

    Malware, or malicious software, is any program or file that is intentionally harmful to a computer, network or server.

SearchCIO
  • chief transformation officer (CTO)

    Chief transformation officer is an executive role, often in the C-suite, that focuses on bringing about change as well as growth ...

  • data latency

    Data latency is the time it takes for data packets to be stored or retrieved. In business intelligence (BI), data latency is how ...

  • chief data officer (CDO)

    A chief data officer (CDO) in many organizations is a C-level executive whose position has evolved into a range of strategic data...

SearchHRSoftware
SearchCustomerExperience
  • implementation

    Implementation is the execution or practice of a plan, a method or any design, idea, model, specification, standard or policy for...

  • first call resolution (FCR)

    First call resolution (FCR) is when customer service agents properly address a customer's needs the first time they call.

  • customer intelligence (CI)

    Customer intelligence (CI) is the process of collecting and analyzing detailed customer data from internal and external sources ...

Close