Browse Definitions :
Definition

threat ignorance

Threat ignorance is a concept used by security professionals to determine the level of vulnerability a company or user’s computer or system has to an attack. The idea of threat ignorance stems from a lack of understanding about how to take basic security precautions on the part of a user. Additionally, some common types of cyberattacks prey on users with high levels of threat ignorance.

Attacks that can be prevented if a user understands viruses and malware include:

  • Credential theft: Often users with high threat ignorance use passwords that are too easy to guess or use the same password for every account. Once this password is identified, the entire system and any data that person has access to can be compromised.
  • Phishing and spear phishing attacks: This is an attempt to access an individual’s personal information by tricking them into allowing malware onto their device. Since these attacks are disguised, users that do not know how to identify them are at risk.
  • Email spoofing attacks: This is when emails are sent with fake email addresses made to look like it is from a known person. A more specific example of this is CEO fraud, when an attacker impersonates an important member of an organization to gain the trust of an unsuspecting user.
  • Denial-of-service attacks: Attackers prevent legitimate users from accessing resources with these attacks, making it hard for users with high threat ignorance to regain control over the system.
  • Automatic update attacks: This type of attack takes advantage of the automatic update functions to push spam to the device. Since most device or software updates are unsuspecting, this makes it easy to infect an unaware user.

Individuals can arm themselves against security threats by staying on top the latest attacks and practicing good security habits. Organizations have safer systems when each user considers themselves an active participant in maintaining the company's security. Most organizations have security protocols, but many do not frequently train employees in these protocols or strongly enforce them.

Best practices to minimize threat ignorance

While most users or organizations will possess some level of threat ignorance, the goal is to make it as minimal as possible. Ways to accomplish this include:

  • Train staff to be able to detect common security threats.
  • Educate employees to stay on top of updates and maintain proper anti-virus and anti-malware programs.
  • Dedicate a single employee or team to handle security for the organization.
  • Stay updated on risk analyses.
  • Enforce password rules, like complexity, confidentiality and routine changes.
  • Require that devices are password protected or use two-factor authentication (2FA).
  • Classify the levels of protection for different sets of resources and create appropriate security protocols for each level.
  • Follow up after security trainings to check employee comprehension.
This was last updated in May 2019

Continue Reading About threat ignorance

SearchNetworking
  • network packet

    A network packet is a basic unit of data that's grouped together and transferred over a computer network, typically a ...

  • virtual network functions (VNFs)

    Virtual network functions (VNFs) are virtualized tasks formerly carried out by proprietary, dedicated hardware.

  • network functions virtualization (NFV)

    Network functions virtualization (NFV) is a network architecture model designed to virtualize network services that have ...

SearchSecurity
  • data breach

    A data breach is a cyber attack in which sensitive, confidential or otherwise protected data has been accessed or disclosed in an...

  • insider threat

    An insider threat is a category of risk posed by those who have access to an organization's physical or digital assets.

  • data compliance

    Data compliance is a process that identifies the applicable governance for data protection, security, storage and other ...

SearchCIO
  • data privacy (information privacy)

    Data privacy, also called information privacy, is an aspect of data protection that addresses the proper storage, access, ...

  • leadership skills

    Leadership skills are the strengths and abilities individuals demonstrate that help to oversee processes, guide initiatives and ...

  • data governance policy

    A data governance policy is a documented set of guidelines for ensuring that an organization's data and information assets are ...

SearchHRSoftware
SearchCustomerExperience
  • recommerce

    Recommerce is the selling of previously owned items through online marketplaces to buyers who reuse, recycle or resell them.

  • implementation

    Implementation is the execution or practice of a plan, a method or any design, idea, model, specification, standard or policy for...

  • first call resolution (FCR)

    First call resolution (FCR) is when customer service agents properly address a customer's needs the first time they call.

Close