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Software applications

Definitions related to software applications, including tech terms about software programs for vertical industries and words and phrases about software development, use and management.

FAU - JOI

  • fault-tolerant - Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, despite one or more of its components failing.
  • FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) - The FDA (U.S.
  • Feature Manipulation Engine (FME) - The Feature Manipulation Engine (FME) is a platform that streamlines the translation of spatial data between geometric and digital formats.
  • fee-for-service (FFS) - Fee-for-service (FFS) is a payment model in which doctors, hospitals, and medical practices charge separately for each service they perform.
  • femtech - 'Femtech' is a term that refers to diagnostic tools, products, services, wearables and software that use technology to address women's health issues, including menstrual health, reproductive health, sexual health, maternal health and menopause.
  • FHIR (Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources) - Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) is an interoperability standard for electronic exchange of healthcare information.
  • file extension (file format) - In a computer, a file extension is the layout of a file -- in terms of how the data within the file is organized.
  • financial analytics - Financial analytics is the creation of ad hoc analysis to answer specific business questions and forecast possible future financial scenarios.
  • Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM) - Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM), formerly called Google Cloud Messaging (GCM), is a free cloud service from Google that allows app developers to send notifications and messages to users across a variety of platforms, including Android, iOS and web applications.
  • Fizt (physics tool) - Fizt (pronounced FIZZ-tee, and short for physics tool) is an animation program that can speed up the production of special effects -- in some cases by a factor of more than 150 to 1 -- and can also make the effects appear more life-like than has been possible with less sophisticated programs.
  • font - The word 'font' refers to a set of printable or displayable typography or text characters in a specific style and size.
  • framework - In general, a framework is a real or conceptual structure intended to serve as a support or guide for the building of something that expands the structure into something useful.
  • freeware - Freeware (not to be confused with free software) is a type of proprietary software that is released without charge to the public.
  • front end and back end - Front end and back end are terms used by programmers and computer professionals to describe the layers that make up hardware, a computer program or a website which are delineated based on how accessible they are to a user.
  • Full Packaged Product (FPP) - Full Packaged Product (FPP) is the retail version of a Microsoft licensed product.
  • functional testing - Functional testing is a process used to evaluate software during development to ensure that it meets the application's intended requirements and specifications.
  • fuzz testing (fuzzing) - Fuzz testing (fuzzing) is a technique used by ethical hackers to discover security loopholes in software, operating systems or networks by massive inputting of random data to the system in an attempt to make it crash.
  • fuzzy search - A fuzzy search is a technique that uses search algorithms to find strings that match patterns approximately.
  • garbage in, garbage out (GIGO) - GIGO (garbage in, garbage out) is a concise expression of a concept common to computer science and mathematics: the quality of output is determined by the quality of the input.
  • gated content / ungated content - Gated content is online materials, such as white papers, articles or videos, that require the user to fill out a form before they can access them.
  • Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles (the Principles) - Generally Accepted Recordkeeping Principles is a framework for managing records in a way that supports an organization's immediate and future regulatory, legal, risk mitigation, environmental and operational requirements.
  • genomics - Genomics is the study of human genes and chromosomes.
  • geo-fencing (geofencing) - Geo-fencing is a feature in a software program that uses the global positioning system (GPS) or radio frequency identification (RFID) to define geographical boundaries.
  • Gmail - Gmail (pronounced Gee-mail) is a free web-based email service that provides users with 15 GB of storage for messages and the ability to search for specific messages.
  • GNOME (GNU Network Object Model Environment) - GNOME (GNU Network Object Model Environment, pronounced gah-NOHM) is a graphical user interface (GUI) and set of computer desktop applications for users of the Linux operating system.
  • golden image - A golden image is a template for a virtual machine (VM), virtual desktop, server or hard disk drive.
  • golden ratio (golden mean) - The golden ratio is a proportion (roughly 1:1.
  • good automated manufacturing practice (GAMP) - Good automated manufacturing practice (GAMP) is a set of guidelines manufacturers and other automation users follow to maintain operational efficiency and reliability.
  • Google Docs - Google Docs, first released in 2006, is a free web-based word processor in which documents can be created, edited and stored as part of the Google Docs Editors suite of free web applications.
  • Google Maps - Google Maps is a web-based service that provides detailed information about geographical regions and sites worldwide.
  • Google Sheets - Google Sheets is a web-based application that enables users to create, update and modify spreadsheets and share the data live online.
  • GraalVM - GraalVM is a tool for developers to write and execute Java code.
  • Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) - The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLB Act or GLBA), also known as the Financial Modernization Act of 1999, is a federal law enacted in the United States to control the ways financial institutions deal with the private information of individuals.
  • grid computing - Grid computing is a system for connecting a large number of computer nodes into a distributed architecture that delivers the compute resources necessary to solve complex problems.
  • guest OS (guest operating system) - A guest OS is the operating system installed on either a virtual machine (VM) or partitioned disk.
  • gzip (GNU zip) - Gzip (GNU zip) is a free and open source algorithm for file compression.
  • Hadoop - Hadoop is an open source distributed processing framework that manages data processing and storage for big data applications running in clustered systems.
  • hamburger icon (slide drawer navigation) - The hamburger icon got its name because it resembles a burger in a bun.
  • haptics - Haptics (pronounced HAP-tiks) is the science of applying touch (tactile) sensation and control to interaction with computer applications.
  • HashiCorp - HashiCorp is a software company that provides a suite of modular DevOps infrastructure provisioning and management products.
  • HCI (human-computer interaction) - HCI (human-computer interaction) is the study of how people interact with computers and to what extent computers are or are not developed for successful interaction with human beings.
  • headless CMS (headless content management system) - A headless content management system (CMS) delivers back-end capabilities for editing, organizing and storing all types of digital information, without regard to how that content is published, displayed or used.
  • health informatics - Health informatics is the practice of acquiring, studying and managing health data and applying medical concepts in conjunction with health information technology systems to help clinicians provide better healthcare.
  • Health Information Exchange (HIE) - Health information exchange (HIE) is the electronic transmission of healthcare-related data among medical facilities, health information organizations -- companies that oversee and govern the exchange of this data -- and government agencies according to national standards.
  • Health IT (health information technology) - Health IT (health information technology) is the area of IT involving the design, development, creation, use and maintenance of information systems for the healthcare industry.
  • Healthcare CIO (healthcare chief information officer) - A healthcare CIO is a healthcare executive with an influence over technology purchasing and other IT business decisions.
  • Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HP Enterprise, HPE) - Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HP Enterprise, also known as HPE) is an American multinational company that specializes in business IT (information technology).
  • HIMSS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society) - The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) is a nonprofit organization whose goal is to promote the best use of IT and management systems in the healthcare industry.
  • HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) - HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) is United States legislation that provides data privacy and security provisions for safeguarding medical information.
  • HIPAA disaster recovery plan - A HIPAA disaster recovery plan is a document that specifies the resources, actions, personnel and data that are required to protect and reinstate healthcare information in the event of a fire, vandalism, natural disaster or system failure.
  • HL7 (Health Level Seven International) - HL7 (Health Level Seven International) is a set of standards, formats and definitions for exchanging and developing electronic health records (EHRs).
  • Host OS (host operating system) - A host OS is the software installed on a computer that interacts with the underlying hardware in a computer using virtualization technology.
  • HTML5 mobile app - HTML5 mobile apps are developed through that version of the Web content standard.
  • hybrid application (hybrid app) - A hybrid application (hybrid app) is one that combines elements of both native and Web applications.
  • hybrid health record (HHR) - A hybrid health record (HHR) is documentation of an individual's health information that is tracked in multiple formats and stored in multiple places.
  • IBM IMS (Information Management System) - IBM IMS (Information Management System) is a database and transaction management system that was first introduced by IBM in 1968.
  • IBM Watson supercomputer - Watson is an IBM supercomputer that combines artificial intelligence (AI) and sophisticated analytical software for optimal performance as a 'question answering' machine.
  • ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision) - The International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition (ICD-10), is a clinical cataloging system that went into effect for the U.
  • ICD-10-CM (Clinical Modification) - The ICD-10-CM (Clinical Modification) is a system used by physicians and other healthcare providers to classify and code all diagnoses, symptoms and procedures recorded in conjunction with hospital care in the United States.
  • ICD-10-PCS - The International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS) is a U.
  • ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification) - ICD-9-CM is the current medical coding standard used in hospitals in the United States.
  • identity management (ID management) - Identity management (ID management) is the organizational process for ensuring that individuals have the appropriate access to technology resources.
  • IDoc (intermediate document) - IDoc (intermediate document) is a standard data structure used in SAP applications to transfer data to and from SAP system applications and external systems.
  • IFTTT (If This Then That) - IFTTT is an online service that automates Web-based tasks so that if one specified event occurs, another is triggered.
  • image metadata - Image metadata is information about an image that is associated with the image file either automatically or deliberately added.
  • image recognition - Image recognition, in the context of machine vision, is the ability of software to identify objects, places, people, writing and actions in images.
  • in-app purchase (IAP) - An in-app purchase (IAP) is something bought from within an application, typically a mobile app running on a smartphone or other mobile device.
  • Inbox Zero - Inbox Zero is a rigorous approach to email management that aims to keep an inbox empty -- or almost empty -- at all times.
  • infographics - An infographic (information graphic) is a representation of information in a graphic format designed to make the data easily understandable at a glance.
  • Information and Content Exchange (ICE) - Information and Content Exchange (ICE) is an XML-based standard protocol for electronic business-to-business (B2B) asset management.
  • information extraction (IE) - Information extraction (IE) is the automated retrieval of specific information related to a selected topic from a body or bodies of text.
  • information lifecycle management (ILM) - Information lifecycle management (ILM) is a comprehensive approach to managing an organization's data and associated metadata, starting with its creation and acquisition through when it becomes obsolete and is deleted.
  • infrastructure management (IM) - For an organization's information technology, infrastructure management (IM) is the management of essential operation components, such as policies, processes, equipment, data, human resources, and external contacts, for overall effectiveness.
  • instance - In object-oriented programming (OOP), an instance is a specific realization of any object.
  • integrated development environment (IDE) - An integrated development environment (IDE) is a software suite that consolidates basic tools required to write and test software.
  • integration server - An integration server is a type of computer server that facilitates the interaction between different operating systems (OSes), services and applications across an enterprise IT environment.
  • integration testing or integration and testing (I&T) - Integration testing -- also known as integration and testing (I&T) -- is a type of software testing in which the different units, modules or components of a software application are tested as a combined entity.
  • intelligent character recognition (ICR) - Intelligent character recognition (ICR) is the computer translation of manually entered text characters into machine-readable characters.
  • Interactive Voice Response (IVR) - Interactive Voice Response (IVR) is an automated telephony system that interacts with callers, gathers information and routes calls to the appropriate recipients.
  • interrupt - An interrupt is a signal emitted by a device attached to a computer or from a program within the computer.
  • IoMT (Internet of Medical Things) or healthcare IoT - The Internet of Medical Things (IoMT) is a network of machine-to-machine communication between medical devices and healthcare IT systems.
  • iOS developer kit - The iOS software development kit (iOS SDK) is a collection of tools for the creation of apps for Apple’s mobile operating system.
  • ISV (independent software vendor) - An ISV (independent software vendor) makes and sells software products that run on one or more computer hardware or operating system (OS) platforms.
  • IT as a Service (ITaaS) - IT as a Service (ITaaS) is a technology-delivery method that treats IT (information technology) as a commodity, providing an enterprise with exactly the amount of hardware, software, and support that it needs for an agreed-on monthly fee.
  • IT chargeback system - An IT chargeback system is an accounting strategy that applies the costs of IT services, hardware or software to the business unit in which they are used.
  • IT controls - An IT control is a procedure or policy that provides a reasonable assurance that the information technology (IT) used by an organization operates as intended, that data is reliable and that the organization is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations.
  • IT distributor - An IT channel distributor is a business that acts as an intermediary between vendors and value-added resellers (VARs) or system integrators (SIs) in the distribution of software or hardware.
  • IT operations - IT operations is the overarching term for the processes and services administered by an organization's information technology (IT) department.
  • IT operations management (ITOM) - IT operations management (ITOM) is the administrative area involving technology infrastructure components and the requirements of individual applications, services, storage, networking and connectivity elements within an organization.
  • IT solution - An information technology (IT) solution is a set of related software programs and/or services that are sold as a single package.
  • iterative - In the world of IT and computer programming, the adjective iterative refers to a process where the design of a product or application is improved by repeated review and testing.
  • iTunes U - iTunes U is a dedicated section of Apple's iTunes Music Store that features educational audio and video files from universities, museums and public media organizations for free download to PCs and mobile devices.
  • JAD (Joint Application Development) - JAD (Joint Application Development) is a methodology that involves the client or end user in the design and development of an application, through a succession of collaborative workshops called JAD sessions.
  • JAR file (Java Archive) - A Java Archive, or JAR file, contains all of the various components that make up a self-contained, executable Java application, deployable Java applet or, most commonly, a Java library to which any Java Runtime Environment can link.
  • JAVA_HOME - JAVA_HOME is an operating system (OS) environment variable which can optionally be set after either the Java Development Kit (JDK) or the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) is installed.
  • JAX-WS (Java API for XML Web Services) - Java API for XML Web Services (JAX-WS) is one of a set of Java technologies used to develop Web services.
  • JBoss - JBoss is a division of Red Hat that provides support for the JBoss open source application server program and related middleware services marketed under the JBoss Enterprise Middleware brand.
  • Jira - Jira is an application lifecycle management (ALM) tool from Atlassian that provides different packages to suit various customer needs.
  • jitter buffer - In voice over IP (VoIP), a jitter buffer is a shared data area where voice packets can be collected, stored, and sent to the voice processor in evenly spaced intervals.
  • Joint Commission - The Joint Commission is an independent group that presently accredits 20,500 healthcare facilities in the United States by performing onsite evaluations.
SearchNetworking
  • throughput

    Throughput is a measure of how many units of information a system can process in a given amount of time.

  • traffic shaping

    Traffic shaping, also known as packet shaping, is a congestion management method that regulates network data transfer by delaying...

  • open networking

    Open networking describes a network that uses open standards and commodity hardware.

SearchSecurity
  • buffer underflow

    A buffer underflow, also known as a buffer underrun or a buffer underwrite, is when the buffer -- the temporary holding space ...

  • single sign-on (SSO)

    Single sign-on (SSO) is a session and user authentication service that permits a user to use one set of login credentials -- for ...

  • pen testing (penetration testing)

    A penetration test, also called a pen test or ethical hacking, is a cybersecurity technique that organizations use to identify, ...

SearchCIO
  • benchmark

    A benchmark is a standard or point of reference people can use to measure something else.

  • spatial computing

    Spatial computing broadly characterizes the processes and tools used to capture, process and interact with 3D data.

  • organizational goals

    Organizational goals are strategic objectives that a company's management establishes to outline expected outcomes and guide ...

SearchHRSoftware
  • talent acquisition

    Talent acquisition is the strategic process employers use to analyze their long-term talent needs in the context of business ...

  • employee retention

    Employee retention is the organizational goal of keeping productive and talented workers and reducing turnover by fostering a ...

  • hybrid work model

    A hybrid work model is a workforce structure that includes employees who work remotely and those who work on site, in a company's...

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